More stories from August's issue of THE BEE!


As the first “SMILE Summer Music Concert” gets underway, Mark Shark and Lloyd Jones begin their show.
As the first “SMILE Summer Music Concert” gets underway, Mark Shark and Lloyd Jones begin their show. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Southeast neighborhood hosts free ‘Summer Music Series’ for all

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Even the frightening spectre of the COVID-19 pandemic has not stopped live summertime music concerts in Inner Southeast Portland – business sponsors and volunteers presented the “September Sounds in Sellwood” series last September.

This year, even though the pandemic was winding down in June, it became clear that the beloved July “Concerts in the Park” series by the Portland Parks Department, sponsored by the Sellwood Moreland Improvement League (SMILE) at Sellwood Park, would not be taking place, for the second year – in fact, no Parks concerts were to take place anywhere in the city in 2021.

“Because our park concerts were cancelled again this year, SMILE decided to host a free 12-concert neighborhood music series that we’re calling the ‘SMILE Summer Music Series’ that runs through the end of August,” the organizer of the concerts, Jim Friscia, told THE BEE. “SMILE” is an acronym for the Sellwood-Moreland Improvement League – the oldest of the 95 neighborhood associations in Portland.

As musicians were setting up the summer series’ opening show on Saturday evening, July 10, held in the Windermere business building’s Westmoreland parking lot, residents and visitors began to drift in – many of them bringing their own chairs, and take-out food purchased from local restaurants.

“Even though we were not able to host our July ‘Concerts in the Park’ series, we decided we still wanted to bring live music to Sellwood and Westmoreland for all the people in Southeast Portland to enjoy,” said Friscia, who is also a SMILE Board Member – and is Chair of its new Events Committee.

Asked why this year’s concerts are taking place in parking lots instead of in parks, Friscia responded, “Even if they allowed it, we’d need to buy permits from Portland Parks & Recreation – and then bring in electricity, a sound system, and perhaps a stage.

“But, because three location partners are providing the space and power, it’s not too much to ask our professional musicians to bring their own sound equipment for these smaller performances,” explained Friscia.

Also, he added, with the dozen concerts taking place in three locations around Sellwood-Westmoreland – see the list below – these are very accessible events.

“And, the booking principle we’ve used is to showcase professional performing musicians who either live in the neighborhood, or play in the neighborhood, such as at the Muddy Rudder, or the Corkscrew Wine Bar. In this way we’re supporting the people and businesses who keep live music in our neighborhood,” Friscia pointed out.

Asked why he was willing to put so much effort into a volunteer concert series project, Friscia replied, “Music is one of those things to which everyone positively responds. Especially live music; it’s something that brings people together, and lifts people up – and that’s central to developing a stronger sense of community.”

The audience assembled for this particular concert knew they were in for a musical treat when they saw the duo of Mark Shark and Sellwood neighbor Lloyd Jones setting up to perform. Mark Shark has played and recorded with such luminaries as Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, and George Harrison; and Jones is a world-famous, internationally-touring roots, blues, and Americana artist.

“It’s true, I’ve played at music festivals before audiences of 10,000 people, but I’m loving being here this evening, because this area – right here – is where it all grew from,” Jones said with an introspective smile.

“For me, this is ‘coming back home’; it’s charming to play here, in my neighborhood. You know, music is meant for people to get together and feel good, in a space like this; in huge venues, [a concert] gets so slick and so technical, and so big, that it loses some of that.

“So, here we are, right back home, and I love it!” said Jones, as he turned away to begin the free concert.

Introducing himself to the audience, Jones revealed that he’s lived “in the same house on the same street here” for 47 years. “When I moved in, I was the hippie in the neighborhood; and now it’s me who’s saying, ‘Hey you kids, get off my lawn’!”

About 150 people attended that outdoor concert; and, to the delight of all who attended, the music flowed for more than two hours.

On Saturday evenings through July 31 in the Windermere Building parking lot, concert-goers were successively entertained by the Soulful Americana of Silver Lake 66; the American Roots and Blues music of Terry Robb & Lauren Sheehan, and others.


August SMILE Summer Music Concerts:

At Sellwood Community House Pavilion (SE 15th and Spokane) Tuesdays, from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m.

August 3Marv and Rindy Ross – Seafood Mama, Quarterflash, Trail Band – versatile Portland superstars

August 10Paula Byrne – Jazz Vocalist

August 17Robert Meade – Upbeat Americana, Rhythm ‘n’ Blues originals & classics

August 24Carpathian-Pacific Express – Klezmer music


At Moreland Presbyterian parking lot (SE 19th & Bybee) Saturdays, from 6:30 until 8:30 p.m.

August 7Annette Lowman Trio – Jazz vocalist and storyteller

August 14Adlai Alexander Trio – Soulful Jazz guitar and vocals

August 21Mary Flower – guitarist and singer

August 28Pete Krebs and The Catnip Bros – Bakersfield Honky Tonk, Western Swing


Note: Available seating will vary, so consider bringing your own chairs. Pick up food at a neighborhood restaurant, or bring a picnic basket from home.

To get a sense of what these concerts are like, here are some highlights of the first one, in an exclusive short BEE video:






Paramedics and Central Precinct officers responded to a shooting on Holgate Boulevard in the Reed neighborhood.
Paramedics and Central Precinct officers responded to a shooting on Holgate Boulevard in the Reed neighborhood. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Man shot and wounded, in the Reed neighborhood

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

In the typically-peaceful Reed neighborhood, shots were heard shortly after dawn on Thursday, July 8, near the corner of S.E. 28th Avenue and Holgate Boulevard.

Central Precinct officers were sent there at 7:09 a.m. When they arrived, officers found a person suffering from an apparent gunshot wound near the Shell gas station on the corner, and its associated Holgate Gas & Grocery mini-mart.

While the victim was taken by ambulance to a local hospital, officers secured the crime scene and went on to search the area for a suspect. The PPB’s Enhanced Community Safety Team was called in to investigate this shooting. No suspect had been found, at last report.

PPB officials declined to provide any suspect information, or to provide information about the seriousness of the victim’s injuries. The investigation is still active, however, and they do ask that if you have any information about this open case, e-mail it to – crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, and let them know it’s regarding “Case No. 21-185866”.

Or, you can send an anonymous tip through Crime Stoppers, and possibly get a cash reward of up to $2,500. Simply go online to – http://www.p3tips.com/823

In 2021 there have been nearly 600 shooting incidents in the City of Portland, and nearly 200 people wounded by gunfire. Outer East Portland has been severely impacted by them, and incidents seem to be creeping closer to Inner Southeast as well. The police appreciate any tips which might be useful in preventing more of them.



Molly Haydon and Dave Armsby, at their S.E. 16th Avenue “Dog Treat Stop”. The dog in their dog house is not real, but the squirrels and crows are not supposed to know that.
Molly Haydon and Dave Armsby, at their S.E. 16th Avenue “Dog Treat Stop”. The dog in their dog house is not real, but the squirrels and crows are not supposed to know that. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Sellwood ‘dog treat station’ offers snacks for passing pooches

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

A Sellwood-Moreland resident’s “Dog Treat Stop” at 7614-B S.E. 16th Avenue has been providing free walk-up treats for dog walkers and their dogs for several months now.

The wooden dog-house-shaped treat stand is complete with a friendly brown stuffed pooch. The canine refreshment station offers hand-cleaner and three grades of free snacks and water bowls. Those three grades do not reflect any difference in quality – only a difference in size: For “big, bigger, and biggest” dogs.

Molly Haydon and Dave Armsby moved to the neighborhood from the suburbs in June of 2020, and have found the dog treat station has helped them get to know their neighbors and their pets. “We used to have a mastiff, but she died a few years ago,” remarks Haydon. “We'll soon be getting a new one. We’ve connected with so many people here through the treat stand, and learned many useful life skills from them. People are so lovely here.”

Inspiration for the dog treat stand came to them as the couple were sitting on their balcony sipping wine and discussing their workdays. They enjoyed watching dog-walkers making loops around the neighborhood. “We learned to watch for a corgi/husky mix named Howie, who would always stop and look up at us, and that started us thinking about creating a treat stand,” recalls Haydon.

“We finally decided to open the dog treat station, so owners and their dogs could choose their own treats. Many puppies have learned to sit for ‘treat training’ here. During the pandemic, we refilled the water bowls often. We order treats monthly from a company called Old Mother Hubbard’s that produces treats from chicken, cheese, and their original formula.

“At first we assembled the treats in baggies by hand – Dave is really good at that,” smiles Haydon. “Then we decided to offer the treats on a table in boxes, but we had to squirrel-proof and crow-proof the containers. It was like running a buffet for dogs.

“When the rainy weather came, we had to cover the containers, so that’s when we decided to make the current doghouse and treat dispensary. The toy pug dog inside the doorway of the doghouse (it was named “Rover” by a four-year-old named Ashlyn) is intended to scare away crows and squirrels. We’ve watched so many pups and kids grow up over the months. There are ‘windows’ of busy times for the dog-walkers, when all the dogs pull their owners over here for a treat!”

Molly and Dave also support the “Make-A-Wish Foundation”. “We’re wish-granters here, and also support a similar program for pets called ‘Wags To Wishes’,” says Haydon. “We try to celebrate holidays with pets, too – such as by offering turkey stick treats around Thanksgiving, or handing out small flags on Flag Day.”

The couple reports being dedicated to pet-friendly activities, and occasionally sets out small dog toys for passing dogs. They’ve gotten to know the names and flavor choices of most of their visitors. Now that they’ve gotten some attention in THE BEE they may be meeting some new ones!



To feed thousands of people on a weekly basis, “Feed the Mass” volunteers help in various ways.  Here filling the meal boxes are, from left: Kylie Farmer, Emi, Woodstock Brown, Angela Owcarv, and Linden Klawittei.
To feed thousands of people on a weekly basis, “Feed the Mass” volunteers help in various ways. Here filling the meal boxes are, from left: Kylie Farmer, Emi, Woodstock Brown, Angela Owcarv, and Linden Klawittei. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)
Jacobsen Valentine, at the stove, in the “Feed the Mass” kitchen.
Jacobsen Valentine, at the stove, in the “Feed the Mass” kitchen. (Courtesy of Feed The Mass)

Youthful cook moves to Southeast, founds a nonprofit, feeds the hungry

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

When he was eleven years old, Jacobsen Valentine moved from Hawai’i to Portland with his mother and grandmother.  His mother was unable to find acceptable work in Hawai’i, so they left the familiar warmth of the island to put their roots down in Portland.

Valentine’s family had always cooked all of their own meals, and loved to have weekend barbeques. Cooking was a way of life, and a love, for the three of them. Valentine thought from an early age that he would like to be a chef one day; but he was young, and so it was his grandmother who went to culinary school in Portland, and became a chef at age 45.

In high school Valentine became involved in sports, and was a star track athlete – earning a scholarship at Mt. Hood Community College. When his best friend saw him losing focus at MHCC, he suggested that Valentine consider taking cooking classes, because he cooked all of the time and seemed passionate about it.

After earning a culinary degree at Western Culinary Institute in Portland, Valentine worked at a number of restaurants – sometimes two or more at a time. When he took a couple of jobs at retirement homes and hospice care centers, he dealt with dietary restrictions and medical needs, and learned a lot about food education and healthy eating.

So it was in 2015, while volunteering as a youth pastor at Holy Family Parish in Eastmoreland, that Valentine took a group of youths to San Francisco to learn about food scarcity among people experiencing homelessness. It was a formative experience. The trip was what sparked his idea for creating a cooking school for young people.

Valentine recounts, of the subsequent nonprofit organization, “‘Feed the Mass’ was created in 2016. I started teaching children how to cook and to bake simple yet healthy food, at their parents’ request. Quickly the word got out, and I was teaching my first ‘Little Chef’ class.” 

Why did he choose the name “Feed the Mass”?  When Valentine heard the Bible story of Jesus feeding the masses with five fish and two loaves of bread, he interpreted that “miracle story” about food multiplying as a story about people sharing with others what little they had. He tells THE BEE, “To feed the masses, you need to teach people to feed each other.”

As a Black-Hawaiian man, and Founder and Executive Director of “Feed the Mass”, Valentine – now 32 – has dedicated five years of his life to make it possible for people of all backgrounds to learn about healthy cooking and eating, and to serve their communities.

When the pandemic struck a year and a half ago, he changed from leading cooking classes to leading teams of volunteers in cooking thousands of healthful meals for people in COVID shelters – motels bought by the city and converted to shelters; community “houseless” camps; and low-income people living alone. Quality surplus food that would normally go to waste is donated by grocery stores, restaurants, farms, and the Oregon Food Bank.

The coronavirus pandemic allowed people who normally don’t have the time to volunteer, to do so. Volunteers from many different neighborhoods helped prepare, box, and deliver meals seven days a week. Volunteers on seventeen “Ambassador Routes” delivered to individuals and low-income apartments on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. “Partnership Routes” delivered daily to temporary shelters, motels, and camps. 

In mid-2020 the program had some 300 volunteers, and almost thirty chefs, serving 1,000 meals weekly. Then, in September of last year, “Feed the Mass” moved from its relatively small facility to the newly re-constructed Breathe Building on S.E. 50th and Sherman Street, south of Division Street. 

“Donations came through the door every five minutes – from restaurants, private citizens, farmers. The plan was to prepare 1,000 meals. It became nearly 2,500 weekly! This showed me there is enough for everyone; but it does take collective effort and collective care,” remarked Danielle Lee, a volunteer “Feed the Mass” food preparer with a background in marketing. And they went on to supply 5,000 meals every week.

To sustain this massive effort, volunteers are still welcome. Lee says, “Thanks to all who have volunteered, donated, and collaborated, for the shot of hope. If you want to get involved go online to – http://www.feedthemass.org – or e-mail: stephanie@feedthemass.com.



Traffic along S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses came to a standstill when a rolled and smashed car came to a stop in the northbound lanes. Here, a tow truck was moving into position to remove it, using the southbound lanes.
Traffic along S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses came to a standstill when a rolled and smashed car came to a stop in the northbound lanes. Here, a tow truck was moving into position to remove it, using the southbound lanes. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Roll-over crash closes SE 82nd at Springwater Trail

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

It became a sort-of “dinner and a show” for those patronizing the food carts at “Cartlandia” on Wednesday evening, June 30: A two-vehicle crash nearby closed down S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses at the Springwater Trail crossing and halted traffic in both directions.

The East Precinct officers who were dispatched to the accident at 7:46 p.m. found an Acura sedan on its roof – but no occupants inside it.

The Acura and a Chevrolet HHR LT SUV had both been northbound on 82nd when the driver of the Acura cut off the Chevy, clipping its fender – swerving – and then rolling over in the road. The Chevy SUV pulled over and parked in a nearby lot, out of the street.

This, according to a witness who said she was out taking a break from work in its parking lot, “I couldn’t believe it, to see two guys squirm out of the smashed-up car, and take off running – that way.” She pointed west on S.E. Crystal Springs Drive. “I asked an officer if the car was stolen. He said no; but he added that this driver has had other issues in the past with driving behavior.”

As a tow truck arrived, officers opened one lane for vehicles to snake through the crash scene. Police had no trouble locating the driver, since his name was on the vehicle registration – fleeing simply made the matter a hit-and-run, adding to the charges he’ll face.

“We will be issuing the driver, who is now in temporary custody, several citations due to this accident,” a PPB officer drily remarked to THE BEE.



Ben Tarne, Chairman of the nonprofit “Friends of Brooklyn Park”, has received a “US Bank Parks Champion” award for his efforts to retain – now community-funded – the former PP&R summer youth program there. The bag of cans is not the award – it’s part of his fund-raising!
Ben Tarne, Chairman of the nonprofit “Friends of Brooklyn Park”, has received a “US Bank Parks Champion” award for his efforts to retain – now community-funded – the former PP&R summer youth program there. The bag of cans is not the award – it’s part of his fund-raising! (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Brooklyn Park advocate receives US Bank ‘Parks Champion’ award

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Over all twelve months, Ben Tarne – Chairman of the Friends of Brooklyn Park – has worked tirelessly to support the Brooklyn neighborhood’s Summer Youth Program for Kids. From the Gala fundraising dinner some time ago, to a highly successful Bottle Drop program in April, and weekly bottle collections year ’round, Tarne has been dedicated to maintaining the summer kids’ program in the park that PP&R no longer supports.

It is largely through his efforts that it again has been running four days a week this summer, starting on June 21.

Tarne’s efforts did not go unnoticed. He was nominated as one of 48 individuals from all over Portland recommended for the Portland Parks Foundation’s “US Bank Parks Champion” award. The award recognizes an individual who provided outstanding volunteer service to a park, community center, natural area, or community garden.

The winners were announced at a virtual event held at the Portland Park Foundation's “Friends & Allies Summit” – and Tarne was one of only two recipients chosen. He told THE BEE, “PPF promises to make a grant of $1,500, on the recommendation of the honorees, to a community organization that aligns with PPF’s vision of helping Portland communities create more equitable access to nature, play, health, and places of connection.”

He described the process which led to the recognition: “Nominations were made through an online form – promoted through the Foundation’s e-mailed newsletter – and were accepted in the spring.” 

It is no surprise that he planned to choose the Friends of Brooklyn Park, and its Summer Youth Program, to receive that $1,500 grant.

Although Brooklyn’s is one of the smaller parks in Inner Southeast, the summer program there, headed by former teacher Craig Montag for over 40 years, has proven to be a popular kid-pleaser – featuring crafts, games, music, ping pong, and of course (on the over 100-degree days) Brooklyn’s famous water slide down the grassy hill.



Officers and firefighter/paramedics confronted a man who was brandishing a knife and behaving wildly, and wrestled him onto a gurney – after his brief rampage on Woodstock Boulevard.
Officers and firefighter/paramedics confronted a man who was brandishing a knife and behaving wildly, and wrestled him onto a gurney – after his brief rampage on Woodstock Boulevard. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Homeless man’ damages vehicles, brandishes knife, in Woodstock

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A man, apparently homeless and known to neighbors as “Jonathan”, rampaged through the Woodstock Neighborhood Business District on Thursday afternoon, June 24.

Reportedly, Portland Parks & Recreation Park Rangers have been encouraging Jonathan to move away from his favorite camping spot at the Woodstock Community Center, without much success.

On this late afternoon, according to several witnesses who spoke with THE BEE, after leaving his camp near the community center he pulled up a tree stake in a curb strip near Advantis Credit Union and broke it into pieces; and then continued across the street to the Portland Fish Market where he was described as “terrorizing the customers”.

The man, who some say appeared to be intoxicated, went on to challenge drivers as he staggered back across S.E. Woodstock Boulevard and into the Bi-Mart parking lot, where he ripped windshield wipers off a car, and then went to another vehicle and stabbed its hood, puncturing it several times with a knife – with a male teenager in the back seat.

When confronted by the owner of one of the cars, the man reportedly pulled a knife, brandished it, and caused the victim to retreat.

Several people called the 9-1-1 Center because of Jonathan’s behavior, and nine Portland Police cruisers were dispatched at 7:31 p.m. that evening. The man, apparently known to East Precinct officers, shouted that he had multiple diseases, including COVID-19, and began spitting at officers and arriving paramedics from Woodstock Fire Station 25.

Officers managed to restrain the man and place a “spit hood” over his head – that’s a loose breathable fabric sack. After being checked out by paramedics at the scene, and restrained on a gurney, the man was taken to a local medical facility for observation.

A day later, at another incident, a PPB officer told THE BEE that this man had been released from custody, and was back on the street in Woodstock, and “back to his old ways”. Hopefully, this time without the knife.



With trash barrels ready to roll – on sizzling Saturday, June 26 – here were Nancy Chapin, Brentwood-Darlington resident and proprietor of TSG Services; clean-up committee chair Alisa Fairweather; and Jacob Loeb of the Montavilla Neighborhood Association.
With trash barrels ready to roll – on sizzling Saturday, June 26 – here were Nancy Chapin, Brentwood-Darlington resident and proprietor of TSG Services; clean-up committee chair Alisa Fairweather; and Jacob Loeb of the Montavilla Neighborhood Association. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Pick it up, Portland’ volunteers gather trash along 82nd Avenue

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

In the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood, rolling red trash barrels down the sidewalks with their “trash pickers” in hand, a sizeable group of volunteers headed out along S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses on the very hot summer Saturday morning of June 26.

These hearty folks were some of the 1,515 volunteers who removed trash from business fronts, parks, and neighborhoods on 82nd, as well as 24 other projects across the city that day – all a part of SOLVE’s fifth annual “Pick It Up, Portland” day.

Organizers made sure everyone had plenty of water as they headed out to pick up litter and other debris – and planting colorful flags at the site of hypodermic needles that was collected later.

“Yes, this is part of Pick It Up Portland; but for us, it’s just one of a series street clean-ups that we are doing this summer, with the 82nd Avenue of Roses Business Association – made possible by a grant through Venture Portland,” explained the clean-up committee’s chair, Alisa Fairweather, who is also Director of Community Engagement at the University of Western States.

“It’s important for us, as a business association, to do this – because our businesses here have really ‘taken a hit’ during the COVID-19 pandemic for more than a year,” Fairweather told THE BEE. “We’re doing this as a way to show these businesses how much we care about them, and give them a little extra help in keeping things looking nice and inviting.

“And, since it is our neighborhood business district, we’re helping make the Avenue of Roses look a little ‘rosier’ today!”

The result? In just two hours, in record-setting heat reaching 108 degrees, volunteers filled 23 bags of trash, which removed an estimated of 800 pounds of trash and garbage from the Avenue of Roses.

Learn more about the 82nd Avenue of Roses Business Association at their website: http://www.82ndaveba.com



It’s not clear what caused the driver of this southbound BMW SUV to strike the concrete Jersey barrier, before losing control and flipping over into this ditch along S.E. Grand Avenue, just north of the Ross Island Bridge.
It’s not clear what caused the driver of this southbound BMW SUV to strike the concrete Jersey barrier, before losing control and flipping over into this ditch along S.E. Grand Avenue, just north of the Ross Island Bridge. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

SUV rolls into ditch near Ross Island Bridge on SE Grand

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Motorists called 9-1-1 to report that a white Sports Utility Vehicle had rolled and crashed in the southbound lanes of Oregon Highway 99-E at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 1, near the Ross Island Bridge. Central Precinct officers and Portland Fire & Rescue crews scrambled to find the crash.

As it turns out, the accident occurred on the viaduct just north of the bridge on S.E. Grand Avenue.

“For unknown reasons, a BMW SUV heading southbound on Grand stuck the center, concrete Jersey barrier – you can see its tire marks visible at the point of impact,” an officer told THE BEE. “The BMW ricocheted off the barrier, traveled across the traffic lanes, and flipped, ending upside down in the ditch.”

Westmoreland Fire Station 20’s Engine Company was just pulling away as we arrived. Reportedly, the driver of the smashed vehicle was not injured; he was standing near the crash speaking with police. The officer reported that a passenger was taken to a local hospital as a precaution, for evaluation and possible treatment, but did not appear to be seriously hurt.

It took two tow trucks to pull the SUV back upright, and slide it on to a flat-bed truck to be taken from the scene. There was no word whether any citations were issued, but the busy highway was shut down for a while.



“Vibe Summer Academy” musical theater director Stephanie Wells leads young performers through a tuneful number in Southeast Portland.
“Vibe Summer Academy” musical theater director Stephanie Wells leads young performers through a tuneful number in Southeast Portland. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Nonprofit ‘Vibe’ holds Foster-Powell musical summer camps

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Although “Vibe of Portland”, a nonprofit art and music educational nonprofit organization founded in 2007, lost their physical studios in the spring of 2020 – due to loss of revenue from the pandemic – they’ve carried on.

“Instead of searching for new studio space, Vibe has set about establishing partnerships with other nonprofits and like-minded businesses in Portland, and has adopted the slogan ‘together we emerge stronger’, as we continue our mission of bringing equitable arts education to young people,” explained Dunja Marcum of Vibe.

“We applied for a grant through the Oregon Community Foundation to run a full program of summer camps we’ve called ‘Vibe Summer Academy: Dreaming Tomorrow’, focusing on offering scholarships to youth in the community,” Marcum explained.

“We are offering full scholarships to our nine-week ‘Summer Academy’ for youth in need, who live primarily in the Lents, Brentwood-Darlington, and Foster-Powell neighborhoods, and the surrounding Southeast Portland area.”

Their community partners include the Green Tulip Peace and Nature School in Foster-Powell, and the Portland Moose Lodge #291 in the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood.

THE BEE was invited to watch kids in the musical theatre camp that’s being run in the Green Tulip Peace and Nature School, as they were rehearsing numbers for their upcoming show outdoors, at the Marysville School playground.

“Together, we have selected four songs; our kids have chosen their characters, and are making costumes for this musical theater show, under the theme of ‘Dreaming Tomorrow’ – which involves traveling through different dimensions!” explained the camp’s musical director, Stephanie Wells, as the youthful performers took their places.

“It’s not frivolous; the camp provides learning opportunities!” Wells remarked. “We’re providing an ‘ensemble building’ experience, as the children learn about musical theater. At the same time, these youngsters are learning how to work with others, and to make friends.

“It’s a joyful ‘connecting’ experience – which is really welcome, especially after this last year of pandemic isolation.”

The Vibe Summer Academy runs through August 20th. For more information about this unique educational organization, go online – https://vibepdx.org



Near a popular 7-Eleven convenience store at S.E. 82nd and Flavel, officers arrived to investigate a shooting that had taken place.
Near a popular 7-Eleven convenience store at S.E. 82nd and Flavel, officers arrived to investigate a shooting that had taken place. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Domestic dispute leads to Brentwood-Darlington shooting

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After several calls to the 9-1-1 Center reporting a loud verbal dispute – and at least one gunshot – a little after sunrise on Wednesday, June 30, an East Precinct officer was sent to the reported location, S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses at Flavel Street.

“An officer responded to the convenience store on that corner,” PPB Public Information Officer Sergeant Kevin Allen confirmed to THE BEE.

Additional officers were advised by dispatchers that the suspect in the imbroglio had taken a TriMet bus towards Clackamas, so the officers headed south along 82nd, and spotted a woman matching the suspect’s description getting off the bus at the Johnson Creek Fred Meyer store.

“Officers arrested the suspect, and recovered a handgun as evidence,” Sgt. Allen said.

In the meantime, police at the convenience store found and recovered evidence of gunfire. “One truck parked in the lot sustained a bullet strike,” Sgt Allen reported. “The person at whom the shot was directed left without speaking to police, but was contacted later, and was confirmed to be unhurt.”

The PPB Special Victims Unit responded to investigate the incident.

37-year-old Shaperriia Loretta Lambert was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) at 11:07 a.m. that morning, on charges of Attempted Murder in the Second Degree (domestic violence), Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon (domestic violence), and Felon in Possession of a Firearm.

At her arraignment, Lambert learned that the Criminal Mischief charge had been dropped, but that she’d still be facing the three remaining Felony charges. At last report, Lambert remained behind bars at MCDC, in lieu of $265,000 combined bail.




Comments? News tips? Click here to e-mail us!

Note to readers: At some point in the future, this, our original Internet website, will probably be replaced at this web address by our new website, as part of the Community Newspapers group. At that time, you will still be able to access this older, but still operative, website, if you save this address:  www.southeastPDXnews.com.  Right now, it leads you to our new website. Eventually, it will lead you back to this old one! Both will be up to date and current, and you'll still have your choice of which one to visit!

READY TO MOVE ON TO THE EDITORIAL, AND THE "LETTERS TO THE EDITOR", ON PAGE 3?   CLICK HERE!