More stories from August's issue of THE BEE!


Enraged motorist, bicycle, fatal, homicide, Flavel Street, Portland, Oregon
Police found the victim’s bicycle jammed under the front of this vehicle. (Courtesy of KPTV Fox 12 Oregon)
Nicholas Pena Martinez, vehicular manslaughter, Southeast Portland, Oregon
Now in jail, facing a count of Felony Second Degree Manslaughter and other charges, is 21 year-old Nicholas Pena Martinez. (MCDC booking photo)

Man on bike dies when run down by ‘raging’ driver

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After the Checkered Flag Tavern, on S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses at Flavel Street, closed down in the wee hours of Sunday morning, June 23 – a scuffle across the street led to a murderous road rage incident, according to a man who was there.

Portland Police Bureau (PPB) officers received a call at 3:32 a.m. about “a person injured in a crash involving a sedan”, near the intersection of S.E. Flavel Street and 79th Avenue.

“Portland Fire & Rescue paramedics arrived and determined the injured adult male bicyclist was deceased at the scene,” said Portland Police spokesperson Lt. Tina Jones.

The PPB Traffic Division Major Crash Team responded to the location and took charge of the investigation, Jones reported.

Later that morning, just after police investigators cleared the scene, neighbor Taud Coffman was looking at paint outlines at the end of his driveway. “This is where they found the bike rider’s shoes,” he remarked. “I’d just gotten up to ‘use the facility’ when I saw all of these units coming into the area with their [flashing emergency] lights on.

“When I went outside to take a look, a guy – who said he was a friend [of the bicyclist] – told me that somehow the two of them ended up across the street from the tavern, at the 7-Eleven store, to get some smokes.

“For some reason, they couldn’t get the cigarettes,” Coffman said that he was told. “When [the bicyclist] couldn’t get them, he asked the girlfriend of another guy standing there for a cigarette – and apparently, that guy got real mad, and there was a little scuffle.

“The guy got on his bike and took off [westbound] on Flavel Street. The couple started fighting; and when the driver got into his car, the girl stayed behind, at the 7-Eleven,” related Coffman.

The driver then took off after the bicyclist at a high rate of speed, caught up with him – and allegedly intentionally smashed his car into him.

“The guy on the bike was hit so hard, it knocked his body from here, in front of my house, to nearly the third house west, down the street,” Coffman pointed out. “I thought I heard the officers here say the car must have been doing 65 mph or better.”

Police later identified the victim of the crash as 32-year-old Lance T. Hart.

“The PPB Major Crash Team investigators arrested 21 year-old Nicholas Pena Martinez, the driver of the involved sedan,” reported Lt. Jones.

Martinez was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center at 10:37 a.m. that morning, on a Felony charge of Manslaughter II, and Misdemeanors of Reckless Driving, and DUII (alcohol).

At his arraignment in Multnomah County District Court, Martinez learned he will face all three charges; he is now in custody at Inverness Jail in lieu of $255,000 combined bail.

Anyone else who witnessed, or has information regarding, this incident is asked to contact Traffic Investigator Phillip Maynard at 503/823-2216.



Portland Bridge Swim, Sellwood, Sellwood Bridge, Sellwood Riverfront Park, Southeast Portland, Oregon
In Sellwood Riverfront Park, this was the second of five waves of swimmers heading into the Willamette River for the Portland Bridge Swim. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Master Swimmers’ depart Sellwood in ‘Bridge Swim’ race

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE 

Just after sunrise on Sunday, July 7, exactly 100 hearty “Master Swimmers” – a special class of competitive swimming, for swimmers 25 years and older – assembled at Sellwood Riverfront Park.

They, and their support crews, had come participate in the ninth annual “Portland Bridge Swim”; and Race Director Marisa Frieder, who is also the organizer of the annual swim, was on hand to greet them.

Since this was an official “United States Masters Swimming” sanctioned event, all of the organization’s rules applied, including a separate awards category for those donning wetsuits. Propulsive devices, such as fins and paddles, and flotation aids, such as pull-buoys, were allowed; but participants were forbidden to grab onto the support kayak assigned to each swimmer.

Many of the swimmers took on the entire 11 mile Willamette River course, passing under the city’s 12 iconic bridges – but others swam in relay teams.

This year, a group calling themselves “Bernardo’s All Stars” traveled down from Tacoma to participate. “We coached the 30 people that we brought this time,” said co-coach Chad Hagedorn. “We’ve been training at our local YMCA since January.”

Both he and his co-coach Katy Smith have themselves completed the Portland Bridge Swim, he said. “When we’re asked why we do this – It’s a good question! We’ve been asking ourselves that since the beginning of January.”

In five waves, all the participants – each accompanied by a kayaker – headed into the Willamette River. Each group first swam south, to get under the Sellwood Bridge, passed around the bridge pylons, and then swam north along the east side of the river, eventually finishing under the St. John’s Bridge.

The result: Six entrants didn’t finish the event. The slowest competitor took a little over eight hours to finish the race. The speediest, 27-year-old Galen Sollom-Brotherton, Assistant Swim Coach at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, completed the course in just under four hours.



Crash, Sellwood Bridge, Southeast Portland, Oregon
A police officer stands by, blocking the east end of the Sellwood Bridge, while a PGE Eagle Crew truck heads toward the downed light pole at the west end of the bridge. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Drunk driver crashes; closes Sellwood Bridge

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A car crash near the west end of the Sellwood Bridge at 10:03 p.m. on Tuesday evening, July 9, brought Portland Police Bureau officers to investigate.

“The bridge was closed due to the crash; the driver was transported to a hospital with serious injuries,” reported Portland Police spokesperson Officer Carlos Ibarra.

A witness to the aftermath of the smashup told THE BEE they saw what looked like an SUV high-centered on a traffic island at the west end of the bridge, and a utility pole down.

Although the crash was not visible from the east end of the bridge, or from the banks of the Willamette River, at 11:17 p.m., a Portland General Electric crew responded from Southeast Portland.

“This was a single vehicle crash,” Ibarra confirmed. “It appears that the driver crashed into a light pole. . . The driver was issued a criminal citation for DUII.”



Gideon Overcrossing, MAX, Union Pacific, pedestrian crossing, Powell Boulevard, Southeast Portland, Oregon
Looking South from S.E. 14th Avenue, near where the Gideon Overcrossing footbridge is to be built, toward the Portland Fire Bureau Station 23 – with its fire practice tower visible – on the north side of Powell Boulevard. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

TriMet’s ‘Gideon Overcrossing’ construction underway

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Monday, May 20, was the official beginning date for a new bike and pedestrian bridge just north of Powell Boulevard called the “Gideon Overcrossing”.

According to TriMet Spokespersons, the new structure – running from S.E. 14th Avenue to S.E. 13th Place and Gideon Street, near the Portland Fire Bureau's Engine House 23 – when finished is intended to allow access to bicycle riders and pedestrians to cross both the Union Pacific Railroad tracks and the MAX Orange Line tracks, without the need to wait for them to clear.

Since the original wooden overcrossing near the site was torn down in 2013 to make room for MAX Orange Line construction, those who want to cross the tracks must currently use the ground-level access at S.E. 12th Avenue and Gideon Street, which is often subject to closure from train and light-rail traffic. The Gideon Overcrossing, which will include exterior lighting, glass elevators, stairs, ADA access, and an aerial walkway, will be open at all times without the need to wait for trains to pass by.

Construction began at the S.E. 14th Avenue site with pre-utility relocations, and is still proceeding – and expected to last about a year. The project places the overhead structure entirely in the existing public right-of-way; and, when completed, the bridge will be owned, operated, and maintained by the City of Portland. The project’s cost is estimated to be about $15 million – which has been freed up from Federal Transit Administration funds already allocated to TriMet.

Land-use issues involving adjacent businesses at the north side of the tracks were settled last December, with the determination that a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement was not required. The new Gideon Overcrossing will also allow easier access to the Orange Line’s Clinton Street Station on the southern side of the MAX tracks.

The completed structure will connect the neighborhood north of Powell to the river, thus completing the city’s vision for an active transportation corridor from the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood to the Willamette River.

TriMet’s Public Information Officer Roberta Altstadt told THE BEE, “We are coordinating closely with Portland Fire Bureau's Station 23, to ensure that construction will not impact their ability to respond to emergencies.”



drifting driver, crash, parked car, brentwood darlington, southeast, portland, oregon
While those involved with the crashed Mitsubishi Lancer gathered their personal goods from inside it, the owners of the parked Acura 3.2TL assessed the damage. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Drifting driver’ in Brentwood-Darlington smashes into parked car

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

People were heading to work on Monday morning, July 8, when a speeding, eastbound Mitsubishi Lancer drifted over the center line of S.E. Flavel Street, in the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood, narrowly missing oncoming traffic – and smashed head-on into a parked Acura “3.2TL” near 68th Avenue.

Portland Police Bureau officers were called to the scene of what was dispatched as an injury accident at 8:37 a.m., met there by Woodstock Fire Station 25 Engine company paramedics, who rendered first aid.

One of the occupants of the ramming vehicle, the Lancer, was transported to a local hospital for evaluation and treatment.

“What happened here is pretty clear,” remarked a responding officer. “It looks as if the Lancer was traveling at a high rate of speed – and the driver drifted across the roadway, and smashed into the Acura, shoving it down the block and out into the street.”

No citations were issued at the scene, but that didn’t rule out a possible citation after the investigation is complete. Officers aided the exchange of information between the responsible driver and the owner of the parked car.



street painting, painted intersection, Sherrett Street, Sellwood, Southeastg, Portland, Oregon
Justin and Virinia Horland coordinated the new street painting “Springwater Crossing” in the intersection of S.E. 16th and Sherrett Street, near Sellwood Middle School. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Another street painting appears on Sellwood’s Sherrett Street

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

There seems to be something about Sherrett Street in Sellwood that just cries out for paint.

The original Share-It Square on Sherrett Street won State of Oregon recognition some years ago; the citation still hangs on the wall of SMILE Station at Tenino and S.E. 13th.

Now, another street painting popped up at the start of summer at the intersection of S.E. 16th and Sherrett, near Sellwood Middle School. Co-Coordinators Virinia and Justin Horland told THE BEE, “It’s called ‘Springwater Crossing’, and celebrates animals of the Springwater Corridor. It’s in the shape of a mandala, with a sunrise in the center surrounded by pictures of a hummingbird, a frog, salmon, and a fox.”

Justin continued, “This project was organized by the Village Building Convergence, which helped us plan and review the design and get city permits. One of the Share-It Square organizers, Sarah Heath, helped us a lot by mixing paint and chalking out the design created by Colleen Smith. Heath also loaned us some of Share-It Square's equipment.”

Virinia chimed in, “We had a neighborhood garage sale in April to help raise funds, along with some donors, and assistance from local businesses. Among our supporters were Springwater Pilates, Meditation for Regular People, Cloud Cap Games, Dance With Joy Studio, and the Rogue Pack theater group. About a hundred neighbors of all ages helped us paint throughout the day. We had a neighborhood potluck earlier, to plan and design the mandala.

“We’e very thankful for all the local businesses’ support,” she added. “Miller Paint sold us the paint at a discount. Verona Pizza and Pasta provided pizzas, and other snacks and pastries were provided by neighbors and New Seasons Market. Coffee was donated by Grand Central, and Blue Kangaroo.”

Kids’ activities at the painting party included rock painting and wooden snake painting, and a scavenger hunt. Greg Raisman from the Portland Bureau of Transportation took a lot of photos earlier in the day. (You can see them at www.facebook.com/greg.raisman.) When the painting was complete, a drone took off to get some overhead pictures. The intersection remained blocked off for an additional day to allow the paint to dry completely.

Neighbors Lois and Twila Jordahl, and Gwen Hyatt, cleaned paintbrushes at the end, while other volunteers wrapped up the scene and stored equipment and paint at the Horland’s home nearby. “We were lucky to have a perfect warm day for the project,” grinned Twila.



Bujrglar, Westmoreland, K-9, escape, Southeast Portland, Oregon
A police dog alerts that the burglary suspect has entered a fenced back yard; but, once inside, officers find the suspect has hopped the fence and gotten away. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Burglary suspect evades capture in Westmoreland

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After a prowler was seen trying to enter a closed business near S.E. Milwaukie Avenue and Henry Street on the morning of July 10, Central Precinct officers responded to the area to look for him at 10:44 a.m.

A caller to the 9-11 Center provided updated information to officers in real time, as the burglary suspect headed east, cutting through backyards.

“A first-arriving officer caught sight of a suspected burglar running from the scene; and with the help of a K9 team from Lake Oswego, Police tracked the man to the area of S.E. 18th and Yukon Street,” a PPB sergeant told THE BEE at the scene.

Apparently the suspect ran though yards and hopped over fences, managing to stay just ahead of the pursuing police.

Although a dozen officers formed a containment perimeter, and searched backyards and streets in the area, after an hour the police dog lost the scent near S.E. 18th Avenue and Knight Street, and the hunt was called off.

The case is not closed, but at THE BEE’s press date, the burglary suspect remained at large.



Brooklyn Park Fundraiser, Rose city Coffee, Southeast Portland, Oregon
Christie Gryphon, owner of Rose City Coffee across from Brooklyn Park, held a July 14 fundraiser to help support the park’s summer programs for kids. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Brooklyn Park summer programs supported by fundraisers and donations

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Christie Gryphon, owner of the Rose City Coffee Shop on S.E. Milwaukie Avenue across from Brooklyn Park, held a fundraiser on July 14 to help support the park’s summer programs, which are no longer underwritten by Portland Parks and Recreation.

From 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on that day, customers were asked as they bought coffee if they wanted to contribute to the fund along with their purchase. By the end of the day, Gryphon told THE BEE, “We brought in $300 in donations, which the coffee shop pledged to match.”

Currently, the Summer Park Program, overseen by longtime park director Craig Montag, is about $3,000 short of what it needs to complete the 2019 summer season. A returnable bottle and can drive organized by Ben Tarne has been bringing in regular donations, however – and Montag has large blue bags with tags for “Friends of Brooklyn Park” stickers (and Rose City Coffee will also be handing out these bags) to be returned full of returnable cans and bottles to Montag at the park. The bottle and can drive is expected to continue throughout the year.

Gryphon suggests that other members of the Greater Brooklyn Business Association may also want to step up to help the summer program. “It’s a wonderful action-packed activity program which operates four days a week for the local youths, in a safe and open environment.”

For more information, go online – http://www.friendsofbrooklynpark.org.



Holgate Boulevard, McLoughlin Boulevard, T bone crash, Highway 99E, Southeast Portland, Oregon
The debris in the street around the smashed black sedan in the background, as well as the inverted position of the Infiniti S.U.V. in the foreground, attest to the violence of the T-bone crash. (Photo by Eric Norberg)

T-bone crash at Holgate & McLoughlin stops traffic for an hour

By ERIC NORBERG
Editor, THE BEE

Police, an ambulance, an ODOT Incident Truck, and several fire engines responded at 3:27 p.m. on Monday afternoon, July 8, when a T-bone collision in the busy intersection brought traffic to a halt for hundreds of motorists on Highway 99E.

Weeks later, THE BEE has been unable to obtain further details about the crash from authorities; but from what we were able to see at the crash site that afternoon, it appeared that a northbound black sedan had collided with the passenger door of a black Infiniti JX35 sport utility vehicle with New Mexico license plates – which apparently had been crossing McLoughlin eastbound from the southbound side exit to Holgate – knocking it onto its top against a utility pole in the entrance to the nearby Union 76 gas station.

The crash had been coded an “injury accident”, and the responding ambulance appeared to leave the scene with someone inside. We also saw a man, possibly the driver of the black sedan, walking between two officers northbound from the wreck, suggesting that at least an interrogation was in progress. But, as mentioned above, at press time for this issue of THE BEE, the Portland Police have been unable to provide any further information about the incident.

The resulting traffic tie-up not only stopped vehicles on the highway, but sparked a great deal of cut-through traffic on nearby streets, creating problems for drivers in the area for over an hour, until the crash scene was cleared.

Stolen car, Woodstock neighborhood, Southeast Portland, Oregon
After spotting the reported-stolen Subaru Forester PZE behind the Woodstock Safeway store, officers began looking for the thief. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
Samuel Brandon Baskow
Although 22-year-old Samuel Brandon Baskow faced two Felony charges – car theft, and burglary – a Multnomah County judge chose to set him free without any bail. (MCDC booking photo)

Woodstock car thief nabbed – but freed the next day

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After East Precinct officers spotted a reported-stolen Subaru Forester PZE behind the Woodstock Safeway store, in the mid-afternoon of Monday, July 15, an employee of another store in the shopping center pointed out to them a man running from the vehicle.

“Officers were able to keep an eye on the suspect, and call in additional resources,” a PPB Central Precinct sergeant told THE BEE.

The suspect headed north along S.E. 45th Avenue, then jogged west on Reedway Street, and continued north until he ducked between houses as he ran along 44th Avenue near Ellis Street.

“It didn’t take long for a police dog to sniff him out, hiding behind a house among the trash cans,” reported a neighbor, who said he’d watched the conclusion of the pursuit, and the suspect being taken into custody.

“The suspect in this incident is 22-year-old Samuel Brandon Baskow, said PPB Public Information Officer Carlos Ibarra, confirming the witness’ details of the episode.

Baskow was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) at 4:16 p.m. that afternoon on two Felony charges: First Degree Burglary, and Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle.

During booking, Baskow learned that combined bail for the two charges was initially set at $55,000.

However, at his arraignment the following day in Multnomah County District Court, a judge disagreed either with the charges or with the bail, and set Baskow free without posting any bail at all.

The official “Release Reason” stated simply: “Court Ordered Release”. It was not clear whether he nonetheless would still be facing the Felony charges in court or not.



Portland Picnic, Portland Bottle Shop, Westmoreland Park, Southeast Portland, Oregon
“Portland Picnic” hosts Travis and Emily Motter invite guests to sample fine wines, brought in from all over the world – in the Portland Bottle Shop Tasting Tent, a fundraiser for the nonprofit “Ride Connection”. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Westmoreland Park ‘Portland Picnic’: Family fun, and fundraising

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

It seems that almost everyone enjoys a picnic in the summertime – so there was a strong turnout when a local merchant again teamed up with a worthy nonprofit organization to present their third annual “Portland Picnic” in Westmoreland Park, in the afternoon and evening of Saturday, July 13.

The “Portland Picnic” was started by Emily and Travis Motter of the Portland Bottle Shop in Sellwood – and has continued as a family-friendly fundraiser for the nonprofit “Ride Connection”, an organization dedicated to coordinating and providing transportation services to people with limited options in the greater Portland area, for more than 25 years.

“While it is for a good cause, we started the ‘Portland Picnic’ to have a fun, free family festival in our neighborhood; one that brings people together and creates a good sense of community,” said Emily Motter, who is also Chief Development Officer at Ride Connection as well as co-owner of The Portland Bottle Shop on S.E. 13th Avenue.

Motter said they were expecting upwards of 5,000 guests at the big outdoor picnic – which also included live music, an “Olde World Puppet Theatre” play area, and many local food vendors.

“We’re really appreciative of the community support of our event,” Motter told THE BEE, which also helped out as a sponsor. “It’s wonderful being part of such a wonderful community where you could do something like this, and people show up to be a part of it.”

Many visitors did bring picnic lunches, and lounged on the park’s grass while they dined; while others patronized vendors. Many, no matter which way they lunched, also availed themselves of wine-tasting tickets, and sampled some of the special wines brought in from all over the world.

“Partnering with local restaurants and companies as vendors is important to us, so we can help showcase Inner Southeast Portland businesses to our guests,” Motter remarked. “The event’s a success because of all of the local people who are involved – especially our 100 volunteers!  They all really made the difference.”

With the afternoon in the park underway, and music playing and neighbors talking, Motter said she could “relax a little” and enjoy it. “The best part of this, for me and Travis, is seeing everybody having a great time; and then, hearing about it from all the people who had a good experience here – and who say they’re looking forward to it again next year.”

Learn more about the benefiting organization, Ride Connection, online – https://www.rideconnection.org.



Anthony Paul Arnold, convicted, prison
49-year-old Anthony Paul Arnold has just been sentenced to more than seven years in prison on Felony Robbery charges, for the 2016 holdup in Southeast Portland. (MCDC booking photo)

Southeast armed robber receives prison term

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE        

A home invasion robbery in the southeast corner of the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood on July 9, 2016, has eventually resulted in three suspects being arrested and sent to prison.

According to Multnomah County District Court records, the trio was high on methamphetamine in a residence in the 7300 block of S.E. Luther Road, just over the county line in unincorporated Clackamas County, when they decided to commit a robbery at a home in the 7000 block of S.E. 66th Avenue.

According to court documents, upon entering the home, Kristopher Knepper head-butted an adult male while Donald Livingston held a gun to the man’s head – and demanded his keys, money, and cell phone; and, Anthony Arnold yelled at the victim something to the effect of, “I thought you had more fight in you.”

Members of the Portland Police Bureau’s Robbery Unit detectives took on the case; their investigation led to the suspects’ arrests.

On May 21, 2017, Livingston pleaded guilty to one count of robbery in the second degree, and was sentenced to 70 months in prison and 36 months of post-prison supervision.

Then, on May 26, 2017, Knepper pleaded guilty to one count of attempted robbery in the second degree; the court imposed a 42 month prison sentence on him, along with eight months of post-prison supervision.

Finally, over two years later, on July 3, 2019, Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill was able to announce that 49-year-old Anthony Arnold received an 85 month prison sentence, after pleading “no contest” for participating in an armed robbery.



Sellwood Park, July Concerts, Sellwood, Southeast Portland, Oregon
Before the first Concert in the Park on July 8, singer Naomi Sparrow, and Rob Stroup’s band “Moody Little Sister”, got together for a BEE photo – after greeting the audience on hand for their performance. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Sellwood’s ‘Concerts in the Park’ move up the bluff

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After years of hosting the July “Concerts in the Park” at Sellwood Riverfront Park, its organizers – now a committee of the Sellwood Moreland Improvement League (SMILE) – decided to move the event “one park over”.

This year, starting with the July 8 concert, families, couples, and singles set up their lawn chairs and picnics in the south end of Sellwood Park, which is the traditional venue for “Sundae in the Park” – itself coming up 12-6 p.m. on August 4.

Although the Concert Committee was concerned that neighbors might not find where the concerts had gone this year, the park did fill up with people before the live music began.

“The change in location came about for a couple of reasons,” explained organizer Jim Friscia, as the first band of the July Monday series performed a “sound check”.

“One reason is, for the last several summers, it’s been hot and sunny down at Riverfront Park; and Sellwood Park is cool and shady,” explained Friscia. “And, frankly, we had many parents concerned about their kids running around and playing in what is, the rest of the year, a ‘dog park’. We listened, and now have shade, picnic tables, and a playground and the pool nearby.”

Changes at Portland Parks & Recreation, which partners in these concerts, caused the concert planners to become a committee of SMILE, thus permitting funds raised to keep the concerts going to be tax-deductible, under SMILE’s 501c3 nonprofit umbrella.

“It’s our great local sponsors who make this happen,” Friscia reflected. “We’re so grateful for our thirty local sponsors this year – perhaps the most we’ve ever had for the concert series!”

Although it’s been a while since the band played at this concert series, Friscia said the committee was enthusiastic to welcome back the band Moody Little Sister – a band that started in Portland, living in the Brooklyn neighborhood before moving out of state. “The four members of this all-string band provide tight harmonies, presenting unique songs with toe-tapping rhythms,” Friscia observed.

The following Monday’s concert featured the Rae Gordon Band – with the “Andean Chicha” sounds of Grupo Masato on July 22, and Rick Layton & Tough Town with “honky-tonk blues” music the last of this year’s series on July 29.

The unpaid Concerts Committee continues its volunteer effort – headed by Friscia himself in many past years – as a labor of love, he said. “We’re looking for new people to join us for next year’s season, to help us bring neighbors, sponsors, and music together for this great community-building effort.” He can be reached through SMILE – the phone number for which is 503/234-3570.



Crash, 82nd, Avenue of Roses, Southeast Portland, Oregon
This smashup closed southbound S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses for an extended period of time on July 16, while the crash was investigated, and the wrecked Honda eventually towed. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Errant driver on 82nd collides with truck

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A collision between a small Honda and a big flat-bed tow truck closed the southbound lanes of S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses, across from Eastport Plaza, for hours on Tuesday, July 16.

Portland Police Bureau officers were dispatched to the intersection of 82nd and Boise Street at 3:49 p.m. that afternoon, as were Portland Fire & Rescue’s Lents Station 11’s Engine and Rescue companies.

“It looked like the driver of the white ‘Honda Fit’ was going north on 82nd Avenue, and tried to make a turn [left, or west] into the [Todd’s Point S Tires] store driveway, instead of turning a few feet up the road, at S.E. Cora Street,” remarked witness Jack Schnabel.

“A flat-bed tow rig, with a car on it, was heading south, and did have a green light going through the [Boise Street] intersection – when the driver of the Honda turned in front of it,” Schnabel told THE BEE.

Although two ambulances were called to the scene, just one woman – who appeared to be a teenager – was transported to a local hospital for evaluation, and possible treatment.






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