More stories from December's issue of THE BEE!


PDX Pickleball Club volunteers were finally allowed to finish putting a weatherproofing coating on the upper tennis courts, behind the Sellwood Pool, before winter weather set in – even though they did much of their renovation without permission from PP&R.
PDX Pickleball Club volunteers were finally allowed to finish putting a weatherproofing coating on the upper tennis courts, behind the Sellwood Pool, before winter weather set in – even though they did much of their renovation without permission from PP&R. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Sellwood pickleball court renovation sparks controversy

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Earlier this year, players of the paddleball game “pickleball” told THE BEE in a feature article just how much they enjoyed this relatively new outdoor sport in Sellwood Park, setting up their equipment on tennis courts located there.

At that time, PDX Pickleball Club’s president Nisa’ Haron told of their group’s effort to rehabilitate and repurpose what it considered a long-disused tennis court in Sellwood Park for pickleball; the court is located directly behind the Sellwood Pool.

“These courts have been ignored for so many years,” said club member Cathy Owen, standing in the court itself in mid October. “The surface has not been maintained, perhaps for decades, leaving it with huge cracks, and weeds causing tripping hazards.” However at least one local tennis player insisted he was regularly using it at a recent SMILE meeting devoted to an airing of this matter.

“We’ve raised about $9,000 to buy supplies for resurfacing these courts, with our club members providing the labor,” Owen told THE BEE. “We saw this as win-win-win scenario for Sellwood Park, Portland Parks & Recreation, and our growing pickleball community, now with 300 members in our club, to restore these courts.”

They say they had received informal approval for the idea from Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) personnel which they’d come across in the park, so they started on June 24. The volunteers began by completing a “proof of concept” in one quadrant of the double tennis court, showing that they had the skills and the right materials to resurface the court.

“We were pleased, and the staff at the park seemed happy with the progress – but we did not have any agreement with Portland Parks and Recreation to allow such volunteer work,” Owen conceded.

Volunteers locked out
“Then, on July 9, we were informed by PP&R that nothing whatsoever could take place on a Parks Bureau tennis court without a ‘process’ [of approval], and approval by the Portland Tennis Center.

“This was a real loss, because when we were kept out of the courts – with lock and chains – we’d not yet weatherized the entire court’s surface yet; so all the work that we had done was at risk, once the weather changed to wet cold weather.”

Wanting to finish the work they’d started, the group was told to obtain a “NPUP” (Non-Public Use Permit) Application; and pay a non-refundable $1,000 fee for their volunteers to continue rehabilitating this PP&R facility at their own expense. The club sent in the application in on July 19.

Finally on September 30, the NPUP permit was approved by City of Portland Attorney’s office; the gates were opened, and work started on October 1. With the help of large “work parties” of volunteers, the surface of the upper tennis court was indeed weatherized. However, the onset of wet weather has halted furthering the project for the time being. 

Tennis vs. pickleball
Over the summer the club kept advocating for the resurfaced area to become dedicated pickleball courts. “When we called PP&R near the end of August, 2021, we learned that we’d have to wait for their ‘Emerging Sports Survey’ to be completed,” Owen said.

“However, speaking with PP&R Planner Katie Dunham, she told me that, because of its four tennis courts, Sellwood Park is considered to be a ‘Community Tennis Hub’; and, that they were not interested in having dedicated pickleball courts here,” she said.

Part of the Parks Bureau concern is that the courts are used for high school tennis competitions. And, local tennis players insist that they use these courts much more frequently than the pickleball advocates say they do.

“We came up with a compromise that leaves both tennis players and pickleball players not so happy; but, it is a compromise,” Owen said.

The result is a “blended” project, with two tennis courts painted prominently for tennis – but also with lines painted within them for use as eight pickleball courts.

In an extended discussion of this issue, involving both pickleball players and tennis players at SMILE, the Sellwood-Westmoreland neighborhood association, the SMILE Board did not take a side in the matter because the informal volunteer renovation had admittedly occurred without the group having approached PP&R for official approval of the project beforehand.

You can follow the local pickleball club online – http://pdxpickleballclub.com



After a near-head-on crash on McLoughlin Boulevard at Ochoco Street on Hallowe’en Day, arriving Milwaukie Police Department officers found two badly-damaged vehicles – and three injured people.
After a near-head-on crash on McLoughlin Boulevard at Ochoco Street on Hallowe’en Day, arriving Milwaukie Police Department officers found two badly-damaged vehicles – and three injured people. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

McLoughlin collision at Ochoco causes serious injuries

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A near-head-on crash closed all lanes of McLoughlin Boulevard for a time shortly after midday on October 31, at its intersection with S.E. Ochoco Street – the southeast border of Sellwood.

Milwaukie Police Officers, dispatched at 1:27 pm, found in the signalized intersection two vehicles with severely-damaged front ends – a green Subaru, and a red Dodge SUV. Both drivers, and a passenger in the Subaru, were sent by ambulance to local hospitals for medical evaluation and care. The Dodge driver was released from the hospital the same day.

During the investigation, it was established that the female driver of a 2020 Subaru Forester, with an elderly female passenger in her front passenger seat, had been coming down the hill from 17th on Ochoco Street, preparing to make a left turn northbound on McLoughlin at the traffic signal. Her car was struck on the front driver’s side by a 2014 Dodge Caravan, operated by 33-year-old Logan Melchert.

When the collided vehicles came to rest, it appeared that both of them had been spun around, about 180°. The Subaru was facing southbound in the south traffic lanes; the Dodge was facing northbound, in the north traffic lanes. Officers aren’t sure which one ran the red light – but they report that Melchert, the Dodge Caravan driver, is being investigated for possible charges of Assault III, DUII, and Reckless Driving.

Both the driver and passenger in the Subaru suffered serious injuries in the smashup, but are expected to fully recover. Anyone who witnessed the crash is asked to contact the Investigating Milwaukie Police Officer, Kenny Simac, at 503/786-7441 – or e-mail: simack@milwaukieoregon.gov. When you do, please reference Case #: 21-7751.



It’s actually required by law to remove graffiti vandalism like this from private property in Portland! (But photograph it first, for the police to use as evidence for future prosecution of the vandals.) Now, thanks to nonprofit “AdoptOneBlock”, small businesses can receive some free equipment to help get it off.
It’s actually required by law to remove graffiti vandalism like this from private property in Portland! (But photograph it first, for the police to use as evidence for future prosecution of the vandals.) Now, thanks to nonprofit “AdoptOneBlock”, small businesses can receive some free equipment to help get it off. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

‘AdoptOneBlock’ grows fast, greatly expands program

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

Earlier this year THE BEE published an article about “AdoptOneBlock”, a nonprofit organization created to help clean up Portland’s neighborhoods.

In January of this year, the number of blocks adopted for cleanup by citizens was 700.  Today the number of blocks being cleaned up by volunteer neighborhood individuals – called Block Ambassadors – is nearly 6,000.

Residents in neighborhoods throughout Portland can sign up to receive free trash grabber sticks, a trash bucket or garbage bags, gloves, and “sharps” medical containers, all at no cost.

“AdoptOneBlock” founder and native Portlander Frank Moscow is proud of the growth and partnerships that have been developed in the last few months. “As of November 1, we were at 4,955 Block Ambassadors committed to consistently cleaning up over 5,823 square blocks.”

And beginning in mid-November the organization made it possible for small businesses in retail business districts to adopt their “linear block”, rather than a square block.  One example of a “linear” block would be one side of Woodstock Boulevard between S.E. 44th and 45th Avenues.

In addition to the normal supplies as mentioned above, these small businesses will receive a graffiti removal kit, paint, and a paint kit, all delivered to their front door for free.

The supplies for the businesses as well as the neighborhood Block Ambassadors are funded by grants from a variety of sources. “We have received grants from many different charitable foundations, as well as civic minded corporations – like Brainium, PGE, NW Natural, Melvin Mark, Downtown Development Group, Navex Global, and others – and many individuals who are interested in supporting a unique scalable solution to make our city cleaner and happier,” Moscow explains.

A recent unique feature of “AdoptOneBlock” is its partnership with “1-800-GOT-JUNK”. A neighbor must have “adopted” his or her block(s) in order to qualify for a free 800-GOT-JUNK pickup. The gathered litter must be in a public space, and bagged up.  A “before” photo with precise location and contact data, and an “after” photo sent once the litter is picked up, are required for the free service.

For hazardous waste, liquids, or more challenging situations, Metro RID now has more teams available, and has shortened their response times. They can be reached online – http://www.ridpatrol.oregonmetro.gov – but removal of personal property is not included, and will be left onsite. Further instructions are available to Block Ambassadors on the “AdoptOneBlock” website.

Anyone not already a Block Ambassador can sign up, and receive materials and instructions for free, by going online – http://www.adoptoneblock.org



A chemical stench from the burned debris continued to emanate from this burned homeless encampment under the east end of the Sellwood Bridge, causing neighbors’ and trail users’ concern. But the fire department assured that no toxics were detected.
A chemical stench from the burned debris continued to emanate from this burned homeless encampment under the east end of the Sellwood Bridge, causing neighbors’ and trail users’ concern. But the fire department assured that no toxics were detected. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Camp under Sellwood Bridge burns; trail users worry about toxics

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

An early morning fire that burned a camp situated under the east approach of the Sellwood Bridge along the Springwater Trail on Sunday, November 7, caused a social media firestorm of comments and questions in and around Sellwood.

Because members of the neighborhood association’s Board, and many neighbors, chimed in on the incident via e-mail and social media, we asked “Sellwood Moreland Improvement League” President Simon Fulford for comment. He responded, “The SMILE community was very concerned about the recent fire in a small tent encampment under the Sellwood Bridge.

“First and foremost, neighbors were concerned for the safety and wellbeing of those who were living there; we’ve tried to find out if anyone was injured, and whether there is any support or assistance that we, as a community, can provide.

“Like all neighborhoods in Portland, we are also very frustrated by the seeming lack of progress being made by the city, county, or state to help and support our homeless and houseless neighbors to find appropriate permanent and affordable housing. The SMILE community is trying to take small steps to help how we can, here in Sellwood and Westmoreland, but we also feel like whatever we do will be just a small drop in a very large bucket of need.”

PF&R provides information
Indeed, Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R) did respond to that fire when it was reported by a resident. Westmoreland Fire Station 20 firefighters arrived at about 6 a.m., and extinguished the fire using their onboard water supply.

“This, in fact, was a tent and contents on fire in a homeless camp,” PF&R Public Information Officer Terry Foster confirmed. “There were no injuries reported.”

According to residents and passers-by on the Springwater Trail, a strong chemical order arose from the encampment for quite some time after the fire. But Foster checked the report and added, “There’s no report of chemical issues. The cause of this fire has not been determined.”



Friends of Moreland Woods Chairman Mark Lakeman presented the agenda for the visioning meeting, held on Llewellyn Elementary School’s covered playground area.
Friends of Moreland Woods Chairman Mark Lakeman presented the agenda for the visioning meeting, held on Llewellyn Elementary School’s covered playground area. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

‘Friends of Moreland Woods’ holds public visioning meeting

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

“Friends of Moreland Woods” was formed by neighbors, primarily in Sellwood and Westmoreland, a couple of years back with the goal of finding a way to acquire the north wooded section of the Wilhelm’s Portland Memorial property – adjacent to Llewellyn Elementary School – for use as a parklike public space.

Recently, the group requested to become a subcommittee of SMILE’s S.N.A.C. committee, so that tax-deductible donations could be made to it. Such checks would be made out to SMILE, the Sellwood-Westmoreland neighborhood association, with the notation that the donation is to be earmarked for “Friends of Moreland Woods”.

The new owners of the funeral home, Foundation Partners of Florida, have decided to use a small section of the two-acre property for a new parking lot, but the remainder – 1.8 acres – is not yet committed, and the Friends group is still seeking ways of buying the lot to preserve it as a Natural Zoned Open Space for public use. The lot is estimated das likely to sell at around a million dollars. The group hopes that if can raise a significant amount, individuals and various local businesses and charities might then donate the rest.

On Saturday, October 23, the group gathered under the covered playground area at the adjacent elementary school to discuss visioning options for the future of this wooded natural area, overlooking the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge.

The two-hour meeting was chaired by Sellwood resident Mark Lakeman, founder & director of “Communitecture”, and considered a national leader in the development of sustainable public places – more than 300 of them in Portland alone. Lakeman remarked, “We are at a critical stage in the preservation of the area. To raise the money needed to secure its future, we need a clear vision for what it will look like.

“We're here today to brainstorm and gather ideas to present a clear vision on what we hope the area will be used for. In November, when we meet with Foundation Partners, we’ll request that the lot, currently zoned R-5 for housing development, not be sold for a full year – during which we hope to raise the funds necessary to purchase ‘Moreland Woods’. There are grants out there; please let us know about them. And let us know of any concerns you may have.”

Some three dozen interested neighbors gathered to listen and offer ideas to define the goals and best uses for Moreland Woods, as well as to prioritize ideas and uses for its future, to explore multiple design ideas, and to “organize the community to help with the next steps”.

Those present were organized into three brainstorming groups to focus on design ideas for using the area as “a natural space for human reflection and interaction”; use for area wildlife, student learning, and social gatherings; and as a place to exercise dogs. There were also ideas for fundraising, which included charging $10 for Save Moreland Woods signs, “buy a brick” plans for pathways, naming each tree for a fee, holding a contest to create artistic benches at the site, and looking for sponsors.

Lakeman summed up the meeting with a hopeful air: “Next we need to compile this feedback to our website – http://www.morelandwoods.org – and then invite comments from people who weren’t able to be here. We need to raise awareness of our planning when we meet with Foundation Partners at the end of the year, to firm up our vision and plans for fundraising.”



This is what about 6,000 Xanax pills look like. They’re laid out on the apartment’s porch by MSCO Special Investigations Unit deputies.
This is what about 6,000 Xanax pills look like. They’re laid out on the apartment’s porch by MSCO Special Investigations Unit deputies. (Courtesy of MCSO)

Raid nets drugs and guns from Reed neighborhood apartment

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

An investigation that started in Gresham some days before, led to the seizure of thousands of illegal pills, as well as four guns, in the Reed Neighborhood on Thursday, October 28.

In the raid, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Deputies, assigned to MCSO’s Special Investigations Unit (SIU), executed a search warrant in a unit at the large Wimbledon Court Apartments complex in Inner Southeast Portland, located north of S.E. Steele Street, along 28th Avenue.

“During a search of an apartment, and of a storage unit, deputies found more than 6,000 tablets of Xanax, nearly 2,000 tablets of Valium, and 150 suspected fentanyl pills,” announced MSCO Communications Director Chris Liedle.

The deputies also located 1,000 doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), three pounds of psilocybin mushrooms, two pounds of marijuana, more than 100 grams of heroin, 80 grams of methamphetamine and various other illicit drugs, Liedle said.

“The suspect had also created ‘ready-to-use meth kits’, which included new smoking pipes and individual doses of meth,” reported Liedle. “Most of the drugs found by deputies were in special packaging, bearing the suspect’s moniker – like a brand name.”

Four illegal firearms were also discovered during the search.

“Investigators were surprised by the sheer volume of illegal drugs that were found, making this bust one of the largest pill seizures by MCSO’s Special Investigations Unit in recent history,” continued Liedle. “41-year-old Wyatt Lazar Reed of Portland was questioned and released, but is subject to further investigation.”



PBOT contractors, with a freshly-installed “speed cushion” along S.E. Flavel Drive. Neighbors say these are already slowing down the speeding drivers on the busy street.
PBOT contractors, with a freshly-installed “speed cushion” along S.E. Flavel Drive. Neighbors say these are already slowing down the speeding drivers on the busy street. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Neighbors lobby for, and get, Flavel Drive ‘speed cushions’

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

For about a year, several prople who live along S.E. Flavel Drive, between the Clackamas County Line at Clatsop/Harney Street, west to 52nd Avenue, told and e-mailed the Brentwood-Darlington Neighborhood Association’s Land Use Committee Chair – Stephenie Frederick – about the problems that speeding traffic was causing on their winding road.

These included:

  • The volume of traffic was growing week by week;
  • Its speed was excessive, and growing worse;
  • Its noise was excessive, and growing worse;
  • More and more large trucks, and vehicles with trailers, were joining these car caravans.

Neighbor moves because of traffic
“One particularly engaged resident told me that the family next door, with small children, had recently sold their house and moved away, because of the danger that the traffic posed to their children,” Frederick told THE BEE.

“That bystander said she’d begun using a radar speed gun to verify her perception that passing traffic was moving well above the posted speed limits,” Frederick recalled. “She’d also learned that ‘Google Maps’ was sending traffic onto S.E. Flavel Drive as a time-saving ‘hypotenuse of the triangle’ formed by Johnson Creek Boulevard, 52nd Avenue, and Flavel Drive.”

The neighbor took the initiative and engaged Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) planner Scott Cohen about the changing nature of the traffic on the street. 

Frederick said that she personally observed that, “Fast, heavy traffic menaced cyclists as well, especially given the absence of painted bicycle lanes; and heavy-duty trucks were almost certainly damaging the pavement of this neighborhood street.”

Looking through some PBOT maps, Frederick said she’d learned that Flavel Drive is considered a “Neighborhood Collector Street”; and, as such, the speed should be limited to 20 mph, not 25 mph as it was posted.

Gets speed limit lowered
“I inquired into this, and PBOT immediately changed out the signs for 20 mph signs,” Frederick said. “PBOT also persuaded Clackamas County to replace signs on its continuation of Flavel Drive, from 30 to 25 mph.”

By fall, 2020, after “quite a bit of communication” with PBOT’s Scott Cohen, Portland Bureau of Planning & Sustainability’s planner Marty Stockton obtained a large planning grant on behalf of a multi-neighborhood area that includes Brentwood-Darlington – and the grant’s process is now well underway.

Then, PBOT’s traffic engineers evaluated the speeds and volumes of traffic on Flavel Drive to obtain official and actionable data. “The data confirmed what residents had been so concerned about, and PBOT categorized S.E. Flavel Drive as a street that required traffic-calming treatment.” 

‘Speed Cushions’ installed
Starting on the first of November, after PBOT found the funding, a crew set about installing speed bumps on the busy street. “Actually we found out they’re called ‘speed cushions’, because they are ‘more friendly’ to fire engines and other emergency vehicles,” Frederick remarked.

“As of early November, even though only some of the ‘speed cushions’ have been installed, I believe I see a slowing of traffic on the street,” Frederick said. “We’re grateful for the help we’ve received from PBOT, as they are doing incredible work with inadequate dollars.”

What about the potholes?
After learning that THE BEE would be featuring this work to improve safety along Flavel Drive, several neighbors asked, “Since the workers have the paving material, tools, and personnel to put in the ‘Speed Cushions’, why not throw a shovel or two of asphalt into some of the growing potholes in the same street?”

We put the question to PBOT – an d PBOT’s Capital Projects, Assets and Maintenance Communications Coordinator, Hannah Schafer, responded: “The new speed cushions on Flavel Drive are funded by the ‘Fixing Our Streets’ program.

“The speed bumps on cut-through routes are installed by a contractor, Brix,” Schafer explained. “Potholes are repaired by our own [PBOT] maintenance operations crews; this is why they weren’t addressed when the speed cushions were installed.

“Folks on Flavel Drive – or any Inner Southeast Portland street – can report pothole locations to us online – http://www.pdxreporter.org – or by phone, at 503/823-1700, and we’ll have a crew out there soon!”



Firefighters pulled hoses and gathered equipment to fight a fire, at the rear of an empty three-story structure in Eastmoreland.
Firefighters pulled hoses and gathered equipment to fight a fire, at the rear of an empty three-story structure in Eastmoreland. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Fire in empty Eastmoreland ‘adult care’ house burns through roof

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A hot-burning fire raced through the large unoccupied building at 3725 S.E. Martins Street, just after 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday evening, October 19.

Although the property is at the corner of S.E. 38th Avenue, it doesn’t connect with Martins Street – it is a dead-end. So, all the responding Portland Fire & Rescue units had to access this steep, uphill, narrow street from S.E. Woodstock Boulevard via 36th Avenue.

The first firefighters arriving reported seeing flames showing from the back of the structure – a 6,345 sq. ft. Adult Foster Care facility built in 1991, and tucked back up into the hillside.

While Westmoreland Fire Station 20 crewmembers hooked up multiple water line hoses Woodstock Fire Station 25’s Engine Company crew made entry to search for any potential victims.

It didn’t take long for firefighters to put out the fire. “There was no need for vertical ventilation; the fire had already burned through the roof, so, in this case, it was ‘self-ventilating’,” a Ladder Truck Company lieutenant remarked to THE BEE at the scene.

“In this incident, the residence was vacant when firefighters arrived,” reported PF&R spokesperson Terry Foster, after the fire. “The main body of the fire was on the third floor, and spread into the void spaces where the walls meet the roof structure in a cockloft [a small loft or attic].

“We had one firefighter suffer minor injuries, as a result of fighting this fire,” Foster disclosed – adding that this fire, in an unoccupied building, is under investigation.



Among the October 30 Brooklyn neighborhood “Leaf Relief” crewmembers were these we found at S.E. Haig Street and Milwaukie Avenue. From left: Cheryl Crowe (group leader), Hans Albing, canine “Obi Wan”, Kat Halpenny, and John Karabaic.
Among the October 30 Brooklyn neighborhood “Leaf Relief” crewmembers were these we found at S.E. Haig Street and Milwaukie Avenue. From left: Cheryl Crowe (group leader), Hans Albing, canine “Obi Wan”, Kat Halpenny, and John Karabaic. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Brooklyn neighbors declare ‘Leaf Relief Days’

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Typically, following the gorgeous autumn display of colored leaves, leaves fall. While it can be fun to shuffle through them, wet leaves can be slippery, and many people don't have time to clean them up. Streets, sidewalks and storm drains become clogged with them and attendant small branches, causing unsafe conditions for foot and vehicle traffic. Removing the leaves can sometimes result in finding lost treasures, or even money.

The Portland Bureau of Transportation has “leaf days” in some sections of Inner Southeast Portland on which it comes and cleans leaves from the streets – but the Brooklyn neighborhood is not one of those areas.

So this fall, the Brooklyn Action Corps neighborhood association organized two “Leaf Relief Days” – October 30, and November 20 – on which residents gathered to do the job themselves, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.. Group leaders had leaf maps showing the areas most needing leaf cleanup, and set up spots to which the leaf bags were to be brought. Local restaurant “Kuchenhaus” at 3131 S.E. 12th Avenue, announced that they'd help with disposal by taking ten bags to their farm.

Volunteers met near Brooklyn School Park, and also near PP&R’s Brooklyn Park, toting rakes, gloves, leaf bags, and their own good cheer to help the volunteers keep the streets and sidewalks safe for all. The October event was intended to free up the area for Hallowe’en Trick-or-Treaters, and the November leaf cleanup was scheduled on Saturday, November 20, just before Thanksgiving.

Questions and volunteering can be directed in an e-mail to: community-connections@brooklyn-neighborhood.org



Officers captured a burglary suspect on the border between the Woodstock and the Ardenwald/Johnson Creek neighborhoods.
Officers captured a burglary suspect on the border between the Woodstock and the Ardenwald/Johnson Creek neighborhoods. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
Although arrested on both a Felony charge and a Misdemeanor charge, 38-year-old Ryan Devan Harris, was released from custody by a judge within hours of his incarceration.
Although arrested on both a Felony charge and a Misdemeanor charge, 38-year-old Ryan Devan Harris, was released from custody by a judge within hours of his incarceration. (MCDC booking photo)

Officers nab burglar near Johnson Creek

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

In a rare moment when Portland police officers weren’t running from one shooting call to another, they were able to track down and arrest a burglary suspect on Wednesday evening, October 27.

At 8:33 p.m. that evening, six officers were dispatched to the western stub of S.E. Harney Street, an area that borders Johnson Creek, west of 45th Avenue.

Officers arrested the man near “Pacific Auto Trim” on S.E. Harney Street, across from Johnson Creek Rentals. “He’s one of our Springwater Trail ‘residents’; we were able to get enough units free to catch him,” an officer told THE BEE at the scene.

“In this case, a suspect was seen breaking into a neighbor’s garage and making off with stolen items,” later confirmed Portland Police spokesperson Sergeant Kevin Allen. “The neighbor pointed out the suspect to the responding officers, who arrested him.”

Arrested was 38-year-old Ryan Devan Harris, who was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center at 10 p.m. that evening on a Class C Felony charge, Burglary in the Second Degree – as well as a Misdemeanor charge of Theft in the Third Degree.

After spending the night in jail, Harris learned that a judge had dismissed his bail, and he was released back into the community the next day, October 28, with instructions to show up for a court date in the future. Release Reason: “Pretrial Supervision”.



FRISBEE TOURNEY WINNERS. The Sellwood Middle Ultimate Frisbee Team, Division A, won Portland Ultimate’s 5th Annual “Flick or Treat Tournament” on Saturday, November 6. They battled teams from Portland, Corvallis, Eugene, and Seattle; played in all types of weather that day – and came away with five wins and one tie. Here’s the team, holding up their championship disc: Back row, from left – Nick Hopkins, Ari Krain, Harrison McDonell, Judah Barnett, Sacha Abraham, and Ben Thornton. Front row, from left – Anna Thornton, Connor Quesnel, Evan Eshel, Caroline Saxton-Rowe, and Asa Gallop.
FRISBEE TOURNEY WINNERS. The Sellwood Middle Ultimate Frisbee Team, Division A, won Portland Ultimate’s 5th Annual “Flick or Treat Tournament” on Saturday, November 6. They battled teams from Portland, Corvallis, Eugene, and Seattle; played in all types of weather that day – and came away with five wins and one tie. Here’s the team, holding up their championship disc: Back row, from left – Nick Hopkins, Ari Krain, Harrison McDonell, Judah Barnett, Sacha Abraham, and Ben Thornton. Front row, from left – Anna Thornton, Connor Quesnel, Evan Eshel, Caroline Saxton-Rowe, and Asa Gallop. (Courtesy Caroleigh Elliott)
Members of the Portland Police “Major Crash Team” begin their investigation into this deadly crash on Powell Boulevard.
Members of the Portland Police “Major Crash Team” begin their investigation into this deadly crash on Powell Boulevard. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Driver kills pedestrian on SE Powell Boulevard

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After dark on Saturday evening, October 30, a pedestrian apparently crossing S.E. Powell Boulevard, and evidently outside of any marked crosswalk, was struck by a sports utility vehicle at 29th Avenue. It was the second similar accident in that area in a month.

Central Precinct officers responded to the incident at 9:49 p.m. that evening, as did emergency medical first-responders.

When they arrived, officers called in the PPB Major Crash Team, after finding a badly injured adult male down in the street. The man was taken to a local hospital, where he died.

“The driver of the involved SUV did remain at the scene,” a PPB official told THE BEE. “The crash is still under investigation.” The identity of the victim has not yet been made public.

If you have any information about this incident, please reference case number 21-304326, and contact – crimetips@portlandoregon.gov, attention Traffic Investigations Unit – or, you can call 503/823-2103.



Eastmoreland residents Steve Kilduff and Chris Cvitanich say they like creating Hallowe’en tableaus that change around every day, at their home.
Eastmoreland residents Steve Kilduff and Chris Cvitanich say they like creating Hallowe’en tableaus that change around every day, at their home. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Hallowe’en skeletons frolicked daily in Eastmoreland

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

In last month’s issue of THE BEE, we again visited the regionally-famous “Davis Graveyard”, in the Ardenwald-Johnson Creek neighborhood.

However, that’s not the only unique Hallowe’en “haunt” in Inner Southeast. Another in-yard attraction – this one, in the Eastmoreland neighborhood – was the “Lambert Street Cemetery”, in Eastmoreland, just a little west of S.E. Chavez Boulevard (formerly 39th).

Unlike static displays, every day the skeletons in this yard appeared to be participating in a different activity. When we visited, they were having fun sledding in the driveway.

“It all started last year, because of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic,” explained resident graveyard keeper Chris Cvitanich. “I’m a Special Education teacher who was providing remote learning, working at home – and we knew we couldn’t have a Hallowe’en party – so I started changing the display every day to entertain myself!

“Personally, I don’t like ‘spooky’ Hallowe’en things; I do like being creative, and I like humor,” she said. “So, this gave me an opportunity to have a fun Hallowe’en place, and make the community happy at the same time.

“Every day, the display is a little different; today is tobogganing skeletons, but we’ve had witches flying through the yard, and skeletons playing slip-and-slide – and ‘Twister’ was an interesting one!”

Even her neighbors to the east got into the “spirit” by changing their display after they went out of town for a few days.

“I’ve kept doing this because I realized how much the community loved it; some neighbors made it point to come by every day, to see what the skeletons were doing,” Ms. Cvitanich grinned.




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