More stories from November's issue of THE BEE!


This unfortunate young lady stumbled into “Site 13” at the Oaks Park Scaregrounds. Can you tell that THE BEE enjoyed driving through this scary tableau?
This unfortunate young lady stumbled into “Site 13” at the Oaks Park Scaregrounds. Can you tell that THE BEE enjoyed driving through this scary tableau? (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Scaregrounds’ brings ‘spirit’ to closed Oaks Park

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Although State of Oregon and Multnomah County regulations wiped out the entire 2020 season for nonprofit Oaks Amusement Park [see this month’s BEE editorial], some limited activities have been allowed to take place – such as outdoor roller skating in the park, and drive-in movies against the wall of the “Hanger” building just inside the gate.

But, starting on October 9, and running through Hallowe’en, the “Scaregrounds Haunted Drive-Thru” brought an elaborate spooky drive-through attraction to the park.

The amusement park’s operating organization, the Oaks Park Association, partnered with Vendetta Productions Inc. – an experienced producer of haunted attractions – to offer Portland a “new kind” of Hallowe’en experience.

According to Vendetta Productions’ partner, Alex Fulmor, they moved seven truckloads of equipment, props, and costuming to the Oaks Park grounds, and with it built five unique haunted attractions from which guests were to choose – and then experience spooky thrills – all from the safety of their own vehicles.

The frightening options included:

  • The Condemned – a cannibal village runs amuck
  • Night Terrors – demonic clowns terrorize a town
  • The Green Run Asylum – where the criminally-insane are “in charge”
  • The Haunting at Hill House – a living ghost story
  • Site 13 – an outbreak of mutants and zombies

“Each attraction is a standalone show; and each one features an introductory video, followed by two scenes, played out in live action with actors and special effects,” Fulmor explained. “We’ve blended together our spectacular, theatrical haunted houses with audio tracks, fully produced like a radio play, and actual live actors along with special effects, to create unique performance art – featuring a cast and crew of about 60.”

Unlike traditional haunted houses you have to personally enter, this was a drive-through “windows-rolled-up” car-by-car event, so guests weren’t in contact by actors or staff – always following COVID-19 guidelines for social distancing and personal protective equipment use.



Keli Cronen, Director of the Homestead Schoolhouse preschool on S.E. Woodstock Boulevard, takes the temperature of five year-old Syd Engel-Nesbitt before he enters the school for the morning. Syd is in his last year of Pre-K at the Homestead.
Keli Cronen, Director of the Homestead Schoolhouse preschool on S.E. Woodstock Boulevard, takes the temperature of five year-old Syd Engel-Nesbitt before he enters the school for the morning. Syd is in his last year of Pre-K at the Homestead. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Preschools reopen in person, adapted to pandemic protocols

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

In September, several preschools in Inner Southeast opened for “in person” instruction, fun, and play. One we’ve chosen as an example is the Homestead Schoolhouse preschool on Woodstock Boulevard across from Otto’s, which also operates the Homestead Annex preschool in the southeast wing of All Saints’ Episcopal Church, one block west.

The Homestead originally closed last March, going on to host virtual learning in the spring, and it was closed all summer. Preschool Director Keli Cronen, and her husband Kiley Cronen, tell THE BEE that it is exciting for everyone to have the children back in the buildings, and outside for play, in both locations.

“When we heard in mid-August that we were given approval to open with [protocol] guidelines from Governor Brown, we decided to go ahead and have in-person classes,” reports Director Keli. “We held our annual open house – but it was virtual – where we explained our plans.  Then we sent out a video to parents showing the new protocols, to help them see what would be required of the students, staff, and parents, and to learn about the year going forward.

“All staff wear face coverings, and all teachers wear a [plastic] shield, when we greet the kids at the front door, or at circle time for songs and stories.” Shields are also worn by teachers when holding small groups or reading groups. Keli reports that most children also agree to wear masks.

Four more teachers were hired, to make possible smaller groups of children, and to help with extra cleaning and sanitizing. Frequent hand washing is required of everyone, especially after certain activities.

Maximum class size is set by the State of Oregon at sixteen, but currently at the Homestead Schoolhouse class sizes are two or more students smaller than that. The Cronens say they have a few children attending who previously went to other preschools that are not yet open in person, and they are expecting that classes will fill up as parents become more confident about sending children back for in-person instruction.

“We have a Spanish class at the Annex for 3-5 year olds, and we are split into smaller groups for art and music. Then [at both locations] we are all together for free-play and academic time. We have two cohorts of classes at both locations. One class is Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; and the other is Tuesday and Thursday,” Keli reports. “We have a few kindergarteners who are doing virtual time at home on the days they aren’t here. The parents are excited to have their children back, and the children are really happy to be back with their friends.”

There are a number of other preschools in Inner Southeast Portland open for in-person instruction – including Blooming Gardens and Puddletown Montessori in Woodstock; and Little Seeds Farm, St. Agatha, and Sellwood Community House Preschools in Sellwood. All are following safe protocol guidelines outlined by the state during the pandemic. Some others are still doing distance learning, and intending to re-evaluate the situation in early November.

For a complete list of available preschools in this part of town, go online and search for “Preschools in Southeast Portland”.



A “Portland Police Explosive Disposal Unit” member suited-up before investigating an explosive device, which looked like a pipe bomb, in Woodstock.
A “Portland Police Explosive Disposal Unit” member suited-up before investigating an explosive device, which looked like a pipe bomb, in Woodstock. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Police defuse bomb scare in Woodstock

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After a neighbor reported seeing what looked like a “pipe bomb” lying on S.E. Woodstock Boulevard near 43rd Avenue, around dawn on Thursday morning, September 24, police officers were dispatched to the area to evaluate the situation at 6:32 a.m.

“East Precinct officers came first; then, members of the PPB Explosive Disposal Unit (EDU) were called in,” reported Public Information Officer Derek Carmon.

The EDU responders safely removed the device, Carmon added. “There is no danger to the public.” So far, it has not been disclosed whether the object was an explosive, but we are told that arson investigators would like to hear from anyone who has specific information.

If you do, please call Detective Meredith Hopper at 503/823-3408 – or via e-mail: Meredith.Hopper@portlandoregon.gov



Craig Johnson was born and raised in the Woodstock Neighborhood – right in this 1895 house. His mother wrote for THE BEE in the 1960s, and was a very active community member.
Craig Johnson was born and raised in the Woodstock Neighborhood – right in this 1895 house. His mother wrote for THE BEE in the 1960s, and was a very active community member. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Deep roots in Woodstock – and a mother who wrote for THE BEE

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

Craig Johnson grew up in Woodstock, when Steele Street had no sidewalks and curbs, when the library was located on the corner of 45th in today’s Ace Hardware location, and when the Woodstock Community Center was still a bungalow-style fire station.

He has deep roots in the neighborhood, and he remembers a lot about those times. He still lives in his 1895 childhood home, on S.E. 40th at Steele Street.

With that history, you might think that Johnson must be in his 80’s, but in fact he is over a decade younger. That is enough time, however, to have memories of many empty lots off of Steele Street; brand new houses being built on Insley Street; and a Post Office on the corner of S.E. 45th and Woodstock where once Country Bill’s Restaurant was located, and where you will now find Gentle Dental.

“Back then, kids were more ‘free range’,” he remembers. “We played all day on vacant lots, rode our bikes down to Sellwood Pool, and kept the same friends from kindergarten through high school.”

He attended Woodstock Elementary, Cleveland High, Whitman College, and then Reed College – that’s where he earned a Master of Arts in Teaching, an experience followed by a ten-year marriage to a French woman, which prepared Johnson to teach French at the Metropolitan Learning Center in Northwest Portland for seventeen years.

Johnson recently revealed that his mother, Edith Ann (Shaw) Johnson, wrote for THE BEE back in the 1960s, when it was owned by Howard and Fern Hilson. He adds, “The Hilsons [still] owned THE BEE when I reported on Cleveland [High] sports in 1964-65.”

Johnson describes his mother as “a very energetic and social person.”  As a writer of articles in what was then called the “Sellwood-Moreland Bee”, he says, “She wrote human-interest stories about folks in Woodstock, Eastmoreland and Westmoreland, and Sellwood. She also published stories in The Oregon Journal, True Story, and in Guidepost.”

Johnson’s mother Edith also worked for the Credit Reporting Company of Portland, about which Johnson remarks, “She would talk to all these women who kept credit records for their businesses. . . One day she realized that they didn’t really know each other [except over the phone], so she organized the ‘Credit Women’s Breakfast Club’, which met regularly downtown.” That organization became permanent, and its model was replicated first in Washington State, and then all over the country and the world – and is today a single organization known as Credit Professionals International (CPI).

The CPI website still quotes Johnson’s mother as having written in 1930: “The Breakfast Club grew out of a golf foursome. Four of us girls from [Woodstock and Sellwood, who worked for] the Credit Reporting Company, had the habit of playing nine holes before breakfast, and then going downtown for a cup of coffee.

“One day, being of a curious disposition, I invited some of the girls, from the various credit offices whose voices I knew so well but had never seen, to join us. Not knowing when to stop, I called as many as I could – and 150 turned up a few mornings later, when we met at the Congress Hotel for breakfast. It was fun getting acquainted, and we then started a permanent organization.” Edith Johnson became president of the club.

Born in Sheffield, England, Johnson’s mother Edith had immigrated to Canada with her parents and seven siblings in 1910, and then came south into the U.S. in 1918, to live in Southeast Portland. After graduating from the Girls’ Polytechnic High School (now Benson High), she attended OSU for a year, until the Great Depression demanded that she work to support her family.

From 1943 to 1956 the family owned the building in which Johnson’ Market operated at S.E. 42nd Avenue and Steele Street. Edith ran the market herself until the store was destroyed in a fire, and then the Johnsons built the fourplex that is there now.

Edith Johnson was a member of the Westmoreland Lawn Bowling Club and a sewing club that had existed for 70 years. She was a resident of Westmoreland's Union Manor from 1991 until she died in 2003, at age 98.

Meantime, Edith Johnson’s father, Vernon Shaw, was active in the All Saints Episcopal Mission congregation in Woodstock before it gained enough members to have its own rector, and then in 1956 it expanded to its present site at S.E. 41st and Woodstock.

Johnson’s father was an engineer in the shipyards, and a surveyor for the Portland Water Bureau.

Having lived for a short time in Bordeaux, France, Johnson says nostalgically, “It’s kind of a strange thing – where Key Bank is now [on Woodstock Boulevard], was once like a little town in France – with small shops, some with residences above.”

These days Johnson, and his wife Jin Darney, are very active in the nonprofit “Eastside Village”, of which Darney comprised the staff until two years ago. Johnson is a driver for “Eastside Village”, providing rides to appointments for people who need them, and serving on its governing council.

“Eastside Village” is not a place, but instead is a nonprofit organization providing services and social opportunities to assist those who want to “age in place” at home. Find out more about it online – http://www.eastsidevillage.org



During the investigation of a pedestrian being struck and injured by a vehicle on Wednesday evening, October 14, an officer spoke with a paramedic on Powell Boulevard.
During the investigation of a pedestrian being struck and injured by a vehicle on Wednesday evening, October 14, an officer spoke with a paramedic on Powell Boulevard. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Jaywalking pedestrian struck and injured on Powell Blvd

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After dark, on Wednesday evening, October 14, a westbound car on S.E. Powell Boulevard hit a pedestrian who had dodged into traffic, east of 22nd Avenue.

Central Precinct officers were first to the incident at 7:26 p.m., as Brooklyn’s “Rescue 23” fire rig responded from twelve blocks away, and finally an ambulance pulled up as well.

PPB officers were focusing their investigation on the northwest corner of the intersection, while paramedics treated the injured pedestrian, who eventually left in the ambulance.

“The person struck was not in a crosswalk, and the driver did not see them enter the road,” PPB Public Information Officer Derek Carmon told THE BEE, after reviewing the official report.

“The pedestrian had minor injuries, and was transported to an area hospital for evaluation,” stated Carmon. “The driver stayed, and cooperated with the investigation; no citations were issued.”



The north entrance to the newly-completed Gideon Street rail overcrossing boasts a new plaza, seen at left, in addition to the stairway at right.
The north entrance to the newly-completed Gideon Street rail overcrossing boasts a new plaza, seen at left, in addition to the stairway at right. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Gideon Street rail overcrossing opens this month

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

The long-awaited Gideon Street overcrossing – extending from S.E. 14th Avenue to the intersection of 13th and Gideon Street near Brooklyn Fire House 23 on the north side of Powell Boulevard – is complete, and will open to pedestrians and bicyclists in mid-November.

The new footbridge crosses over both MAX light rail and Union Pacific Railroad tracks there, at a height of 30 feet. The new pedestrian safety corridor provides a safe north-south link connecting the Hosford-Abernethy neighborhood to the Willamette River, and completes Portland’s vision of the “Clinton to the River” project.

The bridge was originally planned for completion by October, but construction on this final piece of the Portland-Milwaukie Light Rail Transit Project was delayed by the COVID-19 crisis. But the final touches are now in place; and, according to TriMet's Public Information Officer Tyler Graf, “The bridge is expected to open to the public in mid-November.

“Once open, it will be owned and operated by the City of Portland. The joint project between TriMet and the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) should total $15 million, using funds left over from the FTA budget for the MAX Orange Line.”

Graf continues, “During the spring pandemic, TriMet put safeguards in place to prevent spread of COVID-19. Contractors’ workers were advised to use personal protective gear, and observe physical distancing. Project contractor Stacy & Witbeck kept it moving along safely, adding elevator equipment and cyclist-friendly stairways featuring bike gutters at both ends of the bridge.”

Crews also repaved part of the S.E. 14th Avenue end and created a new plaza there, featuring ADA amenities. Near the plaza, a newly-landscaped area added natural color and blooming flowers. The bridge itself will be fully ADA-compliant, featuring elevators large enough to accommodate mobility devices and even bikes with a trailer or child's tag-along attachment. Riders in need of a bike can take one from one of the three Orange Line stations where BIKETOWN is available, including the Clinton/S.E. 12th Avenue Station.

Completion of the overcrossing hopefully means an end to unsafe pedestrian crossings of the two sets of ground-level tracks at S.E. 12th Avenue and the Clinton-Gideon Street interchange. In spite of railroad crossing arms and flashing red lights, many bikers and pedestrians have ignored those warning signals in order to shortcut their daily crossings through the area. Community advocates feel the new structure will create a valuable and safe connection between the Hosford-Abernethy and Brooklyn neighborhoods.



Officers associated with the Portland Police SERT team arrived in Inner Southeast to arrest a man wanted for a downtown Portland murder.
Officers associated with the Portland Police SERT team arrived in Inner Southeast to arrest a man wanted for a downtown Portland murder. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
Now jailed on two felony charges – including murder – is 22 year-old Abdikadir Mohamed Osman.
Now jailed on two felony charges – including murder – is 22 year-old Abdikadir Mohamed Osman. (MCDC booking photo)

Downtown murder suspect found and arrested in Creston-Kenilworth

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A homicide that took place in the Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront Hotel, at about 1 a.m. on Tuesday, October 6, led the police to a suspect who was later arrested in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood in the early morning hours of October 15.

Portland Police Bureau (PPB) Homicide Division detectives identified the victim in the slaying as 23-year-old Shawn Fujioka from southwest Washington State; the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office determined the cause of death was a gunshot wound, and ruled it a homicide.

“On October 8, PPB Homicide Detectives obtained an arrest warrant for 22 year-old Abdikadir Mohamed Osman, in connection with this case,” Portland Police spokesperson Officer Derek Carmon told THE BEE. The arrest was not immediate, because officers still had to find him and serve the warrant.

In the early morning hours of October 15, members of the PPB's Detective Division, Special Emergency Reaction Team (SERT), and U.S. Marshals Fugitive Taskforce tracked the wanted man down to the Kateri Park Apartments on S.E. 28th Avenue, south of Powell Boulevard in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood, and took him into custody.

“A short time later, detectives, with the assistance of SERT officers and the Bureau's Crisis Negotiation Team, served a search warrant at a Brentwood-Darlington home on S.E. 77th Avenue near Harney Street, in connection with this case,” Carmon reported.

Osman was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) at on October 15 at 5:43 a.m. on charges of Murder in the Second Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon. At last report, he was being held in jail without bail.

According to police records, this was the 40th homicide in Portland this year, and the 37th since June 11.



It didn’t take long for firefighters to snuff out a mattress fire, in a third-story bedroom of the Waverly Yacht Club Condominiums.
It didn’t take long for firefighters to snuff out a mattress fire, in a third-story bedroom of the Waverly Yacht Club Condominiums. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Mattress fire briefly threatens Sellwood condos

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Neighbors along the western foot of S.E. Linn Street, as well as residents of the Waverly Yacht Club Condominiums, were alarmed when a fire broke out in the third story of a condominium unit on Wednesday, October 14.

Portland Fire & Rescue was dispatched at 1:14 p.m. On their way, Westmoreland Station Westmoreland Fire Station 20’s Engine Company reported to dispatchers seeing thick dark smoke rising from the building. First in, the crew started hooking up water lines and made entry into the building to search for victims and address the fire.

Two minutes later, the Ladder Truck Company from Burlingame’s Station 10 pulled in. Those firefighters extended their “tiller ladder” to the third story roof; and others extended an extension ladder up to the window of the burning unit.

Firefighters broke out a third-story front window to let smoke and hot gasses escape.

A PF&R Battalion Chief told THE BEE that, based on preliminary information, it had been a mattress fire in the corner bedroom of the condo – and, surprisingly, apparently did NOT appear to be related to “smokers carelessness”. The cause of the ignited mattress still remained to be determined by a PF&R Investigator.

No one was reported injured in the blaze. “Fast, appropriate response saved the structure from damage; it appears the fire didn’t extend beyond the one room,” the Battalion Chief reported.



Investigators look for gunfire debris at the scene of this, yet another Southeast Portland gun violence incident.
Investigators look for gunfire debris at the scene of this, yet another Southeast Portland gun violence incident. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Car shot up in gas station at 82nd and Foster Road

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

On the chilly autumn evening of October 15, all was relatively quiet at the intersection of S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses and Foster Road – until a silver Subaru sedan drove through the Jackson’s Shell station about 10 p.m. and someone inside opened fire on a white Honda Accord sedan, which was stopped at the gas pumps.

Police were dispatched to the “Shots Fired” call at 10:11 p.m.; two East Precinct units rolled up moments later; three more officers fanned out through the neighborhood looking for the shooter’s car.

“Arriving officers learned that a victim was filling up on gas, when a suspect vehicle drove through the south parking lot of the gas station, and fired rounds towards them,” said PPB Public Information Officer Melissa Newhard. “The victim was grazed in the ankle by a bullet; [but because] the victim’s injuries were minor, they were not taken to the hospital.”

It wasn’t long until a PPB Forensics Division Crime Scene Investigator (CSI) arrived, and well as a detective, who began documenting the scene.

Along with the other officers, they found at least seven bullet holes in the Honda, including ones in the hood, windshield, front roof line, as well as the driver’s side door, near the handle. They also found bullet holes in a gas pump, and in promotional sign near the vehicle.

As many as eleven bullet strikes or holes were found at the gas station, in this latest gun violence incident in Southeast Portland. The cause of the murderous attack has not been learned.

“The suspect has not yet been located,” Newhard said, “but this is a continuing investigation.”



Construction is underway for a new townhome condominium development, on the former south parking lot of Wilhelm’s Portland Memorial in Westmoreland.
Construction is underway for a new townhome condominium development, on the former south parking lot of Wilhelm’s Portland Memorial in Westmoreland. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Developer begins construction on Wilhelm’s former parking lot

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Long the temporary site of the Moreland Farmers Market, a former parking lot across from Wilhelm's Portland Memorial Funeral Home just north off Bybee Boulevard in Westmoreland is now a heavy construction site. A developer has started on the fenced lot, officially designated as 1406 S.E. Glenwood Street, where new townhomes will be built.

Consequently, this season, the Moreland Farmers Market moved to Wilhelm’s other, northern, parking lot – but that’s likely temporary as well, since the new owners of Portland Memorial plan to sell that lot, too – explaining that the crowds at funerals no longer are large enough to justify keeping either of their two block-long parking lots.

Kehoe Northwest Properties LLC started in March of 2018 the land use and permitting process on the south lot, in order to turn the asphalt parking lot into a new condominium development, and they are now ready to build.

“This is a townhome style condominium development, with a contemporary style, but still fitting into the neighborhood,” Windermere Realty Trust Broker Blake Ellis, a spokesperson for the project, told THE BEE. “This development will feature nine three-story townhome units, split into two buildings – the front facing the street. Between the buildings will be an alley, for garage access.”

The units will use a “flex design”, but all will feature two bedrooms and two bathrooms on the main living level, plus a “bonus room” on the garage level, with another full bath. “They’re of good size; all units will be in the 2,600 sq ft range,” Ellis said.

The builder expects the construction to wrap up by sometime next summer.



This giant limb split off the trunk of this old oak tree, along SE McLoughlin Boulevard, and fell across the highway, blocking all lanes. By chance, no passing vehicle was impacted. The highway was cleared rapidly by hauling the limb back into Westmoreland Park.
This giant limb split off the trunk of this old oak tree, along SE McLoughlin Boulevard, and fell across the highway, blocking all lanes. By chance, no passing vehicle was impacted. The highway was cleared rapidly by hauling the limb back into Westmoreland Park. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Huge limb falls across all of SE McLoughlin Blvd

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Traffic came to a sudden halt, as motorists on S.E. McLoughlin Boulevard discovered a huge, tree-sized limb lying across the entire highway, a little north of Sckavone Field along Westmoreland Park, on Thursday morning, September 24.

“The oak tree had a large limb come down just before 7 a.m., and it lay across all four lanes of Highway 99E traffic, northbound and southbound,” explained Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) Region 1 Public Information Officer Don Hamilton.

“The word ‘limb’ does it no justice; its diameter rivaled a lot of grown trees outside of the Park Block area,” Hamilton told THE BEE. By great good fortune, it fell when no passing car was underneath in any of the lanes.

ODOT workers grabbed power tools and got to work cutting up the giant limb, hauling away some of the larger pieces.

“The rest was pushed over onto the southbound-side lawn area of the park, using a loader out of our Milwaukie maintenance yard, to get the debris out of the way and get all lanes open by 7:35 a.m.,” Hamilton said.



Officers investigate a machete slashing incident, in which a male victim was hospitalized with serious injuries, in the Foster-Powell neighborhood.
Officers investigate a machete slashing incident, in which a male victim was hospitalized with serious injuries, in the Foster-Powell neighborhood. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
This man, 24-year-old Clayton Matthew Briggs, faces two felony charges in connection with an unexplained machete-swinging attack on a neighbor in the Foster-Powell neighborhood.
This man, 24-year-old Clayton Matthew Briggs, faces two felony charges in connection with an unexplained machete-swinging attack on a neighbor in the Foster-Powell neighborhood. (MCDC booking photo)

Foster-Powell man wounded in slashing machete attack

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

After being attacked on October 12 by a person swinging a machete in the Foster-Powell neighborhood, a male victim is recovering from the serious cuts inflicted on him.

Portland Police Bureau (PPB) East Precinct officers were dispatched to a “stabbing” call at 1:57 p.m. that Monday afternoon, to investigate.

“Officers found an adult male with severe injuries to his leg; the victim was transported to an area hospital,” said PPB Public Information Officer Sergeant Kevin Allen. “The suspect fled the scene once officers arrived; but they were able to quickly find the suspect, and safely take him into custody. Officers recovered a machete nearby.”

What motivated the attack was unclear. “Detectives are currently investigating the incident,” Allen reported. But police did reveal that the attacker was a neighbor of the victim.

The suspect, 24-year-old Clayton Matthew Briggs, was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) at 4:51 p.m. the same afternoon on charges of Assault in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.

At his arraignment that day, Briggs learned he’d face both felony charges. In lieu of $255,000 combined bail, Briggs is still in jail.



By mid-October, the “Oaks Bottom Viewing Platform Project”, on the Springwater Trail at Oaks Park, looked nearly completed.
By mid-October, the “Oaks Bottom Viewing Platform Project”, on the Springwater Trail at Oaks Park, looked nearly completed. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Oaks Bottom Viewing Platform’ takes shape

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Building an elevated area – the “Oaks Bottom Viewing Platform, adjacent to Oaks Park – where folks could step off the Springwater Corridor Trail to view the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Area, was stalled for a while this summer because of crumbling soil in the area.

Contractors found they had to deal with what was called “unexpected underground conditions”, at the point where the ramp from the trail up to the platform was to be built. The problem was resolved by installing “slope stability measures”.

While that work took place, the project didn’t come to a complete standstill. By the end of August, crews were busy framing the platform, securing sturdy posts to the foundation pilings, and building what will be the ramp up to the platform.

However, the smoky and hazardous air from wildfires stalled the project again in mid-September. By mid-October, the railings were installed, and the concrete ramp had been poured and was curing. Yet to be completed, however, was the installation of bike racks. 

When it’s all done, this will be the final amenity to be constructed to complete the “Oaks Bottom Habitat Enhancement Project” started back in 2018 by the Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, the Army Corps of Engineers, and Portland Parks & Recreation. THE BEE will continue to keep an eye on it, and will report its completion.



Officers look inside the stolen Toyota Sienna minivan, after the occupants bailed out – leaving it running, in the middle of a Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood street.
Officers look inside the stolen Toyota Sienna minivan, after the occupants bailed out – leaving it running, in the middle of a Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood street. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
The three arrested after fleeing the stolen vehicle they were driving were, from left, 18-year-old Nasib Abdalla Abdikadir, 22 year-old Ali Daud Talasow, and 18-year-old Mohamud Talasow. None are still in jail.
The three arrested after fleeing the stolen vehicle they were driving were, from left, 18-year-old Nasib Abdalla Abdikadir, 22 year-old Ali Daud Talasow, and 18-year-old Mohamud Talasow. None are still in jail. (MCDC booking photos)

Stolen van brings SERT officers to Creston-Kenilworth

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

October 12 was a Saturday in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood. Shortly after 1 p.m. its streets were filling with Central Precinct units responding to a “Suspicious subject or vehicle” call.

It didn’t take long for officers to close off the streets, from S.E. Powell Boulevard south to Rhone Street, and from S.E. 26th to 28th Avenues – when as many as 29 officers and members of the PPB Special Emergency Response Team (SERT) flooded the area.

An officer told THE BEE at the incident that three men were seen in a stolen minivan that they believed could be connected with an armed robbery, and thus, might possibly be armed.

The incident had started a few minutes before the 12:59 p.m. dispatch, as patrol officers took notice of a Toyota Sienna that had been reported stolen, and began to follow the minivan in the neighborhood.

The van turned from S.E. 27th Avenue, north onto Rhone Street – the driver apparently unaware that it was a dead end. The driver had no room to make a U-turn on the narrow street as officers closed in, so all three men in the stolen vehicle bailed out and ran into the neighborhood.

The incident ended at 3:43 p.m., when the last of the three suspects was taken into custody.

Later, police spokesperson Officer Derek Carmon told THE BEE, “Looking at the report, there was a fear that the subjects might have been armed, and that is the reason so many officers, including on-duty SERT officers, were sent to the incident. But no guns were recovered.”

The three subjects who were arrested are identified as:

18-year-old Nasib Abdalla Abdikadir, who was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center MCDC at 4:49 p.m. that afternoon on a Class C Felony charge of Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle. He was released the same day of this arrest after arraignment. Reason: “Released on Own Recognizance”.

22 year-old Ali Daud Talasow, who was booked into the MCDC at 5:51 p.m. the day of his arrest on a Class C Felony charge of Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle. He was released the same day after his arraignment. Reason: “Posted Bail”.

18-year-old Mohamud Talasow, who was booked into the MCDC at 5:45 p.m. on a Class C Felony charge of Possession of a Stolen Motor Vehicle, and Misdemeanor charges of Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver, Interfering with a Police Officer, and Attempt to Elude on Foot. He was arraigned, and then released the following day. Reason: “Released on Own Recognizance”.




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