THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


PBOT’s “Healthy Businesses” permits allow for “temporary changes along streets to give people more space to conduct business safely” – such as this new “Parking Plaza”, along S.E. Bybee Boulevard, just east of Milwaukie Avenue. (This one, surprisingly, is in what used to be a “no parking” zone – used to stage right turns.)
PBOT’s “Healthy Businesses” permits allow for “temporary changes along streets to give people more space to conduct business safely” – such as this new “Parking Plaza”, along S.E. Bybee Boulevard, just east of Milwaukie Avenue. (This one, surprisingly, is in what used to be a “no parking” zone – used to stage right turns.) (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Businesses, neighbors, mull city’s ‘Sellwood Square’ plan

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

In the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) “Safe Streets Initiative”, which the Bureau says is in response to the COVID-19 public health crisis, part of the proposed initiative is issuing “Healthy Businesses Permits” as part of their “Business Toolkit”. That includes permits allowing “temporary changes to streets, to give people more space to conduct business safely”.

Typically, the “Healthy Businesses” permit is issued to a single business, allowing it to mark off street parking areas in front of their stores or restaurants for public commercial use.

Expanding PBOT's “Healthy Businesses Permit”, the Bureau has proffered a new initiative (not a “program”, we’re told) beyond parking spaces used as outdoor retail areas. The new plan includes closing off entire streets for special time periods, such as weekends, to help “neighborhoods to develop a more cohesive strategy for use of space, by creating community plazas and/or pedestrian promenades”.

In an e-mail newsletter, Sellwood Moreland Business Alliance (SMBA) Executive Director Terra McGibbon revealed a proposal for such a “Main Street Plaza” in Sellwood, originally called the “Sellwood Square”.

After selecting this name, and obtaining an internet address for it, organizers discovered there was already an enclave of small businesses in Sellwood named “Old Sellwood Square”, at 8235 SE 13th Avenue – so the project promoters said they’re working to choose a new name for the plan – but that name hadn’t been revealed at deadline.

In this proposal, two blocks of S.E. 13th Avenue between Nehalem and Lexington Streets would be closed to all motor vehicle traffic on Saturdays and Sundays, from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. Organizers are developing layouts for such a “Main Street Plaza”.

Additionally, from noon until 9 p.m. daily, one block just west of S.E. 13th Avenue – which PBOT calls a “Side Street Plaza” – would be closed to motor vehicle traffic at:

  • S.E. Lexington Street
  • S.E. Nehalem Street
  • S.E. Spokane Street

Why organizers selected these specific blocks is unclear.

During the July online meeting of the SMILE Transportation Committee, attended by 15 participants, including those who are promoting the “Sellwood Square” project, Chair Scott Kelly gave information he’d learned about how Sellwood’s version of such plazas would play out:

  • The side street plazas (on S.E. Lexington, Nehalem, and Spokane streets) would only be in front of businesses, not residences.
  • A minimum 11-foot wide lane for bikes and emergency vehicles would be maintained, clear through each plaza.
  • The plazas require site plans, developed by the applicants; and traffic control plans, developed by PBOT.
  • The permits, once approved by PBOT, would be temporary, with a current expiration date of November 1 – although the end date is potentially subject to change.

Transportation questions about closing down S.E. 13th Avenue each weekend revolved around is how traffic would be directed around the closure; and, rerouting the TriMet #70 Bus route off of 13th Avenue to S.E. 17th Avenue.

Kelly checked with PBOT about a question raised during the meeting, about an apartment driveway on the west side of S.E. 13th Avenue between Nehalem and Miller Streets – specifically, whether residents would be able to use the 11-foot wide emergency lane to access their own parking lot on weekends.

“Greg Raisman at PBOT said this would not be allowed,” Kelly reported. “In order to allow regular motor vehicle traffic, PBOT would want a 14-foot wide one-way lane. Use of the lane for deliveries would also require a 14-foot wide lane. This would, essentially, make the plaza on 13th Avenue half the street wide.”

During that meeting, supporters stated that 76 residents had signed a petition in support of the plan. “No one in attendance expressed opposition to the proposal during the Transportation Committee meeting,” Kelly told THE BEE.

The proposal was submitted to Sellwood Moreland Improvement League Board (SMILE) at their public monthly meeting, held online on Wednesday evening, July 15.

Eight SMILE Board Members voted in favor of the discussed proposal; and two abstained. Some concerns were voiced about the inconvenience for local residents, and visitors to Oaks Park, in having to walk from 13th to 17th to catch the Bus 70 when 13th would be closed for the “promenade”.

As the project unfolds, more information is expected to be posted on their website, which currently is online at – http://www.sellwoodsquare.com



Café Rowan’s owner and chef, Spencer Ivankoe, has finally opened his breakfast, brunch, and lunch restaurant at 4437 S.E. Chavez Blvd. at Holgate. He hopes later to add a dinner menu as well.
Café Rowan’s owner and chef, Spencer Ivankoe, has finally opened his breakfast, brunch, and lunch restaurant at 4437 S.E. Chavez Blvd. at Holgate. He hopes later to add a dinner menu as well. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

‘Café Rowan’ finally open at S.E. Holgate and Chavez Blvds.

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Months after he originally planned to open his new restaurant, Oregon’s coronavirus status finally allowed Sellwood resident Spencer Ivankoe to open his new Café Rowan, in the space formerly occupied by a Starbucks at 4437 S.E. Chavez Blvd. (formerly 39th), on the corner of Holgate. The restaurant is named after his dog.

The Grand Opening was on Thursday, July 9. Owner and Chef Ivankoe renovated the space into a 42-seat restaurant and café. In addition to the to-go orders (see the menu at http://www.caferowan.com), there’s now socially-distanced dine-in too. Ivankoe offers high-end brunch fare, as well as breakfast and lunch. 

“I don’t want it to be a touristy kind of place, but rather a family-oriented café with creative breakfasts, special-designed smoothies, house-made granola, and breakfast sandwiches.

“Our lunches feature inventive combinations of fresh local ingredients – with a flair for the unusual. We also serve Coava coffee and Steven Smith Teamaker Teas. We hope soon to offer evening dining as well, with Oregon wines and a small live music program.”

Spencer Ivankoe tells THE BEE he became interested in cooking at a young age; and after attending culinary school, he worked for ten years in the business back east. Following that, he attended Baruch College, earning a degree in Operations Management in 2016. He then relocated to Portland, where he had always dreamed of living and operating a specialty restaurant.

Parking for Café Rowan is in a small lot at the west side of the Kupie Center building, where a sign at the entrance cautions, “No Mask, No Entry.”

Currently, hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., and weekends from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; closed Mondays.  Call 503/841-5072 for information, or to place to-go orders – or just stop by to order in person.

Ivankoe hopes Café Rowan will become a favorite dining spot in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood.



Brent Heeb, of “Stars Antiques Malls” in Westmoreland, holds a photo of his late partner, Darwin Otto.
Brent Heeb, of “Stars Antiques Malls” in Westmoreland, holds a photo of his late partner, Darwin Otto. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Darwin Otto, Sellwood antiques legend, passes

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

With the tumult caused by the arrival of the COVID-19 coronavirus earlier this year, the passing on March 15 of Sellwood antique dealer Charles Darwin Otto went unnoticed, except by his close friends.

His longtime partner in “Stars and Spendid, Inc.”, Brent Heeb, told THE BEE about the man known as Darwin Otto.

“Darwin came to Sellwood in the mid 1970's when he opened up his antiques shop, ‘ETC Antiques’. He ran his shop until we started up ‘Stars Antiques Malls’ in 1990. He previously had lived close to Reed College, but then moved into the Sellwood neighborhood several years after opening his shop.  So he has been a fixture in Sellwood for quite some time.

“The partners came together in 1987 to produce a lifestyle country antiques show at Montgomery Park called ‘The Magic of Oregon’. After doing these shows for several years, we decided to open up an antiques mall.  Darwin was familiar with this concept from his days of shopping on the East Coast. Tom Brown had the space in Westmoreland, and we just did it. Thirty years later we are still in business.”

Otto was important to Inner Southeast Portland, Heeb reflected, “Because he believed in the Sellwood-Moreland neighborhood, both having a business in Westmoreland and living here for many years. He supported the idea of neighborhoods that were vital with shops and services that enhanced its livability. And, he lived to see the transformation of Sellwood and Westmoreland over the last 50 years. 

His best memory of Otto, Heeb said, was when he walked into his original shop, ‘ETC”.

“I thought I had died and gone to heaven. It was a treasure trove of country antiques and found objects. I could tell this was a man of creativity and taste. Later, after becoming friends, I fell in love with this kind and thoughtful man; we celebrated 36 years together in February.

“Darwin was a man of few words, but he was beloved by his customers and friends. He just had something that drew people to him. He lived his life to the fullest.”



Head Chef Eric Detrick works the To-Go window at the newly-renamed “R F’s Bar & Grill”, 4729 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue in the Brooklyn neighborhood.
Head Chef Eric Detrick works the To-Go window at the newly-renamed “R F’s Bar & Grill”, 4729 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue in the Brooklyn neighborhood. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Bar and Grill changes hands on SE Milwaukie in Brooklyn

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

The former site of a Chinese restaurant just north of McLoughlin and south of Holgate on Milwaukie Avenue was, until recently, called “Bar 33”. Now, under new owner Carla Cary, it has been renamed “R F's Bar & Grill”. “I purchased this place and moved up here from Salem to be closer to family,” she tells THE BEE.

“We originally had a staff of seven, and had just installed our new signs and flooring when the Governor decreed that restaurants and bars were to be designated Take-Out only for the current coronavirus crisis. I'm currently trying to keep two staff busy from 4 to 9 p.m. at our Take-Out window.”

Head Chef Eric Detrick operates the on-site smoker, and hands out fliers. “Our favorite menu orders, so far, are smoked baby back ribs, pork, chicken, and turkey,” he says. “Our home-made Mac & Cheese, burgers, and Jive Turkey sandwich are also popular. We also fill growlers with beer and cider. We’ll have more selections when we are able to re-open the restaurant, but currently our menu is posted by the Take-Out window.”

Owner Cary is originally from Arkansas, and favors jambalaya and pub-style food. “This is our first restaurant,” she remarks, “Although my husband also has a law firm in Salem. Indoors, here, we have seating for 100, with several big screen TVs tuned to sports. We also feature pool tables, an air hockey game, and a State Lottery room. We also have parking areas on both sides of the building, and a wonderful backyard patio – it’s dog-friendly – with seating for 50.

“I know we'll survive this setback, and I hope things will be back to normal soon,” she adds. “You can walk up to our To-Go window or order ahead at 503/719-4344.”



Devin “Red” Briggs, inside her new vintage and modern clothing store at 3376 S.E. Powell Boulevard, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood.
Devin “Red” Briggs, inside her new vintage and modern clothing store at 3376 S.E. Powell Boulevard, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Vintage and modern clothing shop opens on Powell

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

What once was home to the Decca Hardware Company, in the Creston-Kenilworth neighborhood on Powell Boulevard, now is the location for a new business dealing in softer goods – specifically, vintage and modern clothing.

The new business is called “Red & Friends”, and it is situated at 3376 S.E. Powell Boulevard. Owner Devin “Red” Briggs says she opened with four vendors, including Walking Paradox Shop, Vintage Island, and Dead & Detached.

“In our 2,000-square-foot space, with two dressing areas, we include two separate shops at the back of this store: True’s Lingerie, and Stackin Kickz streetwear. We’re also looking for more vendors from our community who project the same style and aesthetic as our store,” remarks Briggs. “Call me at 1-213/760-4550 if you’re interested.”

Currently the shop is open Mondays through Saturdays from noon until 5 p.m. “We carry clothing for both men and women,” she says. “We call our style ‘curated and reworked vintage, and one-of-a-kind modern’. We’re hoping to extend our hours after the pandemic restrictions are lifted. Otherwise, masks are required for you to come in and browse.”







BUSINESS BRIEFS


At left is Daniel Kim, a PSU student and “intern Project Manager”, and at right, Project Manager Rory Matheny, at the site of their forthcoming Brooklyn townhome development.
At left is Daniel Kim, a PSU student and “intern Project Manager”, and at right, Project Manager Rory Matheny, at the site of their forthcoming Brooklyn townhome development. (Photo by Eric Norberg)

Townhome project underway in Brooklyn neighborhood: A business called “Green Oregon Construction”, in an innovative publicity move, announced for Friday, July 3, a ribbon-cutting for its new “Brooklyn-503, the Towns” two-townhouse development at 3220 S.E. 12th Avenue, a block and a half south of Powell Boulevard. What was innovative about that, was that they hadn’t built it yet! At the appointed hour, the two executives on hand decided not to bother with the ribbon cutting, and instead held up a banner in front of the excavated lot. The new two-townhouse high-end development will be three stories with included parking, each with three bedrooms and baths, a pro media room “fully wired for the digital age”, wood flooring and timber exposed beams, and “Northwest stone masonry throughout”. The sale price of each of the two townhomes is expected to be in the neighborhood of $750,000; and construction should be completed by the end of the year. To learn more, go online – http://www.brooklyn-503.com 

New Westmoreland family restaurant opens takeout window: Downtown Portland’s “Bullard” restaurant, and Woodlark Hotel bar, “Abigail Hall”, are owned by Holler Co. partners Jen Quist and chef Doug Adams (Adams is touted as a former finalist on “Top Chef”). Starting Thursday, July 9, those partners are also operating a Westmoreland family-friendly neighborhood restaurant with the same name as their company: “Holler”. It’s on the ground floor of the new block-sized “Meetinghouse” apartment development, at 7119 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue. The menu centers around its well-reviewed fried chicken, burgers, and similar dishes, as well as ice cream. Although the restaurant eventually intends to have customers seated in its available indoor space, right now only a takeout window is open, due to the COVID-19 coronavirus crisis. The hours of operation are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m, to 5 p.m. – and for information, or to order, call 971/200-1391. 

Fitness studio is open in Westmoreland:  Owner Micah Rabwin advises THE BEE that “Essential Strength Studio”, still under the “Rivet Fitness” sign, is now up and running. “We are a Smart Gym using science and technology to provide super-efficient, safe, and socially distant fitness. Our workouts are so efficient, people here only typically spend 20 minutes to one hour in the gym per WEEK! All exercises are automatically tailored to each client’s level of fitness, so it’s perfect for athletes trying to gain an edge in their sport, people recovering from injuries, seniors, and everyone in between. Minimum time commitment, minimum exposure, and real results. Additionally, we are only allowing one client in the gym at a time, so it’s a private gym experience. As a 15 year resident of Sellwood, I’m proud and excited to open this business at S.E. 17th and McLoughlin Boulevard.” The business’ telephone number, for more information, is 503/389-8786.



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