THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


Holy Family Catholic School Principal Joe Galati and instructor Susana Parodi hold the school’s award check, as OnPoint Sellwood Branch Manager Tara Cunningham then presents an additional “crystal award”.
Holy Family Catholic School Principal Joe Galati and instructor Susana Parodi hold the school’s award check, as OnPoint Sellwood Branch Manager Tara Cunningham then presents an additional “crystal award”. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Holy Family School receives OnPoint ‘Community Build Award’

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Not long ago, Holy Family Catholic School in Eastmoreland was named the “OnPoint Community Build Award Winner” for 2021.

“I’m so happy about this; we’re expanding the project that was started, in a small way, twelve years ago, by creating our ‘Equity Team’ here at the school,” explained Holy Family School teacher Susana Parodi, as she accepted the $5,000 check on behalf of the school.

Parodi pointed out that THE BEE had covered several of the school’s annual “International Fairs” – one of the activities that had come out of that committee. Specifically, Parodi said that the school will use funds from the grant to engage guest speakers from different cultures, to provide books for the ‘social justice book club’, to purchase food for cooking classes, and to provide art supplies. 

“One of our staff members, Eden Goffredi, wrote this grant application, thinking that with the funding, we could go beyond only including our students, and also include the parents and the whole community around us – to promote tolerance, peace, diversity, and inclusion,” Parodi added.

At the ceremony at the OnPoint Community Credit Union branch on S.E. 13th and Tacoma Street in Sellwood, Holy Family Catholic School Principal Joe Galati was also on hand: “For us at Holy Family, this is a dream come true; it supports our incredibly gifted committee who put together this ‘Racial Equity Plan’, that makes sure that we honor diversity, and acknowledge and truly recognize the challenges that exist.

“And, at the same time, it’s time to truly celebrate everything that our community has, and give our children the opportunity to learn more,” Galati said.

“I am just so excited and so thrilled for them; and, I’m excited to be a part of helping this school on its journey,” remarked OnPoint Branch Manager Tara Cunningham.



Hannah Villanueva, an owner of “Little Rituals” with Jessica Doss, opened the new shop at 6024 SE Milwaukie Avenue in partnership with “Variegated Vines”, owned by Vanessa Vandervort and Cassandra Leung. Two distinct businesses sharing one store.
Hannah Villanueva, an owner of “Little Rituals” with Jessica Doss, opened the new shop at 6024 SE Milwaukie Avenue in partnership with “Variegated Vines”, owned by Vanessa Vandervort and Cassandra Leung. Two distinct businesses sharing one store. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

A ‘double business’ opens in Westmoreland business building

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Westmoreland’s “Iron Horse Building” at 6024 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue, site of the former iconic restaurant of the same name, is now a small business venue – and it is continuing to attract new shops.

The newest business space open in the building houses two home décor providers: Westmoreland Little Rituals, owned by Hannah Villanueva and Jessica Doss; teamed up with Variegated Vines, owned by Vanessa Vandervort and Cassandra Leung. They share one unit in the building.

Potted plants – and a cheerful doormat proclaiming “Be Kind” with an over-arching rainbow – welcome visitors at the entrance of the 600-sq-ft space. The small, bright shop offers a variety of home goods and gift items. “We carry a selection of cards, and gift-shop, apothecary, and self-care items,” discloses Villanueva. “We also carry art, ceramics, jewelry, candles, plants, plant pots, and plant care products, all of which will brighten your home or office.”

Villanueva tells THE BEE, “We're open Tuesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m., but we’re closed on Sundays and Mondays. You can also shop online anytime: http://www.little-rituals.com – or at http://www.variegatedvines.com

The Iron Horse Properties building still has a small number of vacant storefront openings, since Yoga Riot has now moved on from the site. If you're interested in exploring the empty units, telephone owner John Farley at 503/704-5674.



A new Dollar Tree store has opened in the new shopping center created at the former location of the “Original Taco House”, at 3550 S.E. Powell Boulevard.
A new Dollar Tree store has opened in the new shopping center created at the former location of the “Original Taco House”, at 3550 S.E. Powell Boulevard. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Retail updating of SE Powell Blvd continues, with new ‘Dollar Tree’

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

A new movie theater complex opened recently near S.E. Powell Boulevard and Chavez (formerly 39th Avenue); a bowling alley east of Cleveland High was converted into a small Target store; and now a nondescript shopping center with an empty “Original Taco House” restaurant, further east on the south side of Powell, is being revived as a fresh shopping option with new businesses, a food truck pod – and most recently, a new branch of the national Dollar Tree chain.

The official address is 3550 S.E. Powell, and the store’s Grand Opening was on Thursday, June 10; but people are still discovering where they are. The new store is adjacent to “John's Marketplace”, and has about thirty parking spaces out in front. A cold drink dispenser provides hot-weather treats, as well as some dairy items and frozen foods. The hours of the business are 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, and Sundays 10 to 8.

Manager Steven Springer tells THE BEE that his 7,500-sq.-ft. business will feature a variety of wares, with each item only $1 or less. Included are food, cleaners, toys, books, snacks, health and beauty aids, tools, greeting cards (2 for $1), balloons, holiday features, arts and crafts, a few auto supplies, replacement batteries, and supplies for kitchen, office, and garden. There are fifteen employees.

To learn more, phone 503/535-6717, or go online – http://www.dollartree.com



In mid-June, this century-old Douglas fir tree was felled to make way for an 84-unit apartment complex on the large lot previously occupied by the Chinese Presbyterian Church – on Woodstock Boulevard at 50th. It lay there a few days; but then was cleared away with everything else, except for dirt and a huge pile of broken cement.
In mid-June, this century-old Douglas fir tree was felled to make way for an 84-unit apartment complex on the large lot previously occupied by the Chinese Presbyterian Church – on Woodstock Boulevard at 50th. It lay there a few days; but then was cleared away with everything else, except for dirt and a huge pile of broken cement. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Towering Douglas fir felled for new development on Woodstock

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

The sweet smell of freshly-cut fir was hanging heavily in the air.

A 120-foot-tall Douglas fir on the northeast edge of the property formerly occupied by the now-demolished Chinese Presbyterian Church, at S.E. 50th and Woodstock Boulevard, was cut down on Tuesday, June 15th. It was still lying where it fell days later.

A retired city forester and Woodstock resident who walked daily by the tree in his youth on his way to school, remembers the distinctive tree even then; so some estimates are that it may have been at least 150 years old when it was felled for the new 84 unit apartment complex with retail shops on the ground floor that are planned for that large lot. Previously, the developer of the future apartment complex had said the tree could be saved, but in the end, its location was apparently deemed inconvenient.

The Woodstock Neighborhood is known for its many stately Douglas Firs, and the logo of the neighborhood is the depiction of such a tree. Now some residents of the neighborhood have begun wondering aloud how many of these trees may be left, after our Inner Southeast Portland neighborhoods reach the housing density that the city is advocating?

Large trees do provide cooling shade, and also absorb more carbon dioxide than do smaller trees – and, with the long-term trend toward increasing heat in the Pacific Northwest, the City of Portland might before long be motivated to ask developers to make more accommodations in their building plans to enable mature trees to be preserved – and perhaps even to be incorporated into their structures, with the use of creative design.

Meet Brittany Fasull, owner of a new “vintage” shop in Westmoreland – called “Wild Daisy” – in the former Iron Horse Restaurant building, 6032 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue.
Meet Brittany Fasull, owner of a new “vintage” shop in Westmoreland – called “Wild Daisy” – in the former Iron Horse Restaurant building, 6032 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Vintage clothing store opens in Westmoreland

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

We’ve reported in the recent past about vintage clothing stores in Sellwood; and now there’s one in Westmoreland, too. Passers-by may have seen an array of vintage clothing and other items displayed in front of the former Iron Horse Restaurant building; it was calling attention to a new vintage store called “Wild Daisy” which opened at 6032 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue on Saturday, June 19.

During the record late-June heat wave, a large colorful suitcase, a woven basket, and a wading pool decorated like a slice of watermelon were on display in front of the store.

Owner Brittany Fasull tells THE BEE that she operates the business by herself, keeping hours of Wednesday through Friday 1 to 6 p.m., Saturdays from noon until 5 p.m., and Sundays from noon until 4. The 1,400 sq. ft. store offers a colorful array of vintage clothing, and socks, as well as crystals, and tarot cards. There is a dressing room for try-ons, and a variety of furniture and gift items on display.

“I will give you a sustainable shopping experience,” Brittany declares with a smile. “I also have handmade jewelry and natural tie-dye items that I make myself.”

For more information, check the Instagram account “wilddaisyportland”.




BUSINESS BRIEFS


This is one of the new works by Reed Neighborhood artist Cary Sneider in his one-man, one-day show on S.E. Steele Street on Sunday, August 22.
This is one of the new works by Reed Neighborhood artist Cary Sneider in his one-man, one-day show on S.E. Steele Street on Sunday, August 22.

Reed Neighborhood artist offers exhibit in driveway: Longtime sketch and paint artist Cary Sneider is a full-time science educator, and until recently he only painted during vacations, using watercolors “since they were easy to pack”. However, that changed during the pandemic, with a lot more time at home. His latest paintings, “Lost Year of Flight,” were inspired by images that he’s seen from “his preferred window seat during dozens of flights around the country over the past 30 years”. Sneider studied with artists Ed Mayo of Kennebunkport, Maine, and Jack Jones, of Rockport, Massachusetts.  His work was displayed from 2014-2016 at the 4th Street Gallery in Manzanita, Oregon. Sneider’s new oil paintings, watercolors, and pastels will be on display in Cary’s driveway for safe outdoor viewing at 3834 S.E. Steele Street on Sunday, August 22, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is unclear whether any are for sale, but if you are particularly interested in one, you might inquire.

Advantis Credit Union breaks ground for new headquarters: Advantis Credit Union is consolidating three administrative sites into one location in Oregon City, after the nonprofit banking organization sold its previous north Milwaukie headquarters to the city for $6.5 million in June of last year. PGE’s Electra Central Credit Union and PACE Employees' Credit Union merged to become Advantis Credit Union on Oct. 1, 2005. Advantis held a groundbreaking ceremony June 2 to mark the start of construction on its new corporate campus at 14405 Meyers Road in Oregon City. Advantis' headquarters will be located within a block of Clackamas Community College, the Oregon City School District’s transportation facility, and the newly dedicated Tyrone S. Woods Memorial Park. Advantis has nine branches in the Portland metro area; its Inner Southeast Portland branch is situated at 4235 S.E. Woodstock Boulevard. The credit union is also online at – https://www.advantiscu.org

Southeast children’s author selected by Multnomah County Libraries: Sellwood children’s author Mindy Hardwick’s new middle grade book, “Some Stories Are Not Seen”, has been selected by Multnomah County Libraries to be included in the “Library Writer’s Project Collection”. Each year the county library system places a call for local authors who would like to see their e-books added to the collection. “Some Stories Are Not Seen” is the story of an eleven-year-old girl, Lucy Lavender, who is trying to save the Sea Stars from a disease. Mindy was inspired to write the story while volunteering for the Haystack Rock Awareness Program in Cannon Beach. The story draws attention to the “Sea Star Wasting Syndrome”, which has devastated the population of Sea Stars up and down the Pacific Coast since 2014. This is Mindy's seventh published book; her other middle grade novels include “Seymour’s Secret” and “Stained Glass Summer”. When Mindy is not writing, she teaches online high school English classes at Metro East Web Academy in Gresham.

Here are some of  the Adirondack chairs, but you will have to provide your own little girl and sunflower!
Here are some of the Adirondack chairs, but you will have to provide your own little girl and sunflower!

Local grandfather makes chairs, with grandson: Shannon Ellison advises, “My dad, Gene Scrutton, is a lifelong craftsman, and took my son Braeden under his wing during COVID. They started a business building furniture called ‘Oregon Adirondack’. Specifically, what they are building are Adirondack chairs and porch swings for immediate sale. The chairs and swings are hand-built and painted in Inner Southeast, using locally sourced materials. Chairs are being sold for $150 and porch swings for $299. Having a goal and working hard, and learning alongside my father, changed my son’s life! He graduated from LaSalle High School, after 11 years at St Agatha’s, in June – and will be leaving to Marine boot camp in September. But the furniture is still being built and is available.” For more information, and a look at the furniture, go online – http://www.oregonadirondack.com

Denise Stern offers new local office for in-person meetings: Denise L. Stern, practicing estate and business law in Sellwood-Moreland since 1995, has moved her public office to 1616 S.E. Bybee Boulevard in Westmoreland. She continues to offer telephone and ZOOM consultations for those who find them more convenient, as she did throughout the pandemic. Her telephone number is 503/231-9340. Or, for more information, go online – http://www.denise-stern-law.com 

Rhody Garden gets “small grant” from Portland Parks Foundation: The Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, on S.E. 28th Avenue just west of the Reed College campus, has received a “small grant from the Portland Parks Foundation to assist in piloting a program called “Rooting Among Rhodies”, with the Latino Network and SUN Community Schools, to bring youth to the famous nonprofit Gardens for “fun outdoor learning opportunities”. The program aims to center the experiences of communities of color in public spaces. Students from Kelly and Bridger Elementary Schools will visit Crystal Springs for outdoor socio-emotional learning. The program “hopes to build cohesion in the children's learning community and help create a stronger sense of ownership and connection to the garden.” Funds from PPF’s “small grant” will ensure that the students from the two elementary schools can get to the garden, free of cost to them. Buses will bring the students to Crystal Springs to enjoy, learn, and connect with nature.

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