THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


Owners Anne and Jim Brown have owned the Savory Spice Shop across from the Sellwood Branch Library since 2012. The store serves the community with customized proportions and mixes of hundreds of spices, as well as condiments and kitchen gadgets.
Owners Anne and Jim Brown have owned the Savory Spice Shop across from the Sellwood Branch Library since 2012. The store serves the community with customized proportions and mixes of hundreds of spices, as well as condiments and kitchen gadgets. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Spice up ‘pandemic cooking’ with help from a Southeast store

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

If you are experiencing pandemic doldrums, and you’re getting tired of your own home cooking, you can spice up a special dish, or add a dash of difference to an old standby recipe, with the assistance of the Sellwood Savory Spice Shop.

The same applies to cooking for a special occasion: It is easy to find exotic recipes on the Internet using favorite main ingredients that will please your partner, friend, spouse, or family. But finding the needed, often unusual, spice for that dish is not always easy. And finding a better spice for an everyday or every-week favorite just might not happen, if the cook doesn’t explore a bit.

The “Savory Spice Shop”, at 7857 S.E. 13th Avenue across from the Sellwood Branch Library, is set up to help customers explore spices and condiments. The shop is one of three of this franchise in the Pacific Northwest – another is in Bend; and there is also one in Lynnwood, Washington, outside of Seattle.

Sellwood shop owners Jim and Anne Brown bought into the franchise nearly nine years ago – because Jim had spent over 35 years in the world of corporate finance and accounting, and felt it was time for a change.

“I’ve always enjoyed cooking and playing around with flavors in the kitchen. So, when I discovered the opportunity to open a Savory Spice Shop as franchise owner/operator, I was very intrigued. I fell in love with the ‘Savory Spice’ mission, which is to provide the home cook with the largest and freshest selection of top-quality culinary spices available anywhere in the country,” remarks Brown. The Sellwood store has a total of 600 spice products, 100 of which are locally-sourced.

In July of last year, the Browns took the next step in developing their business, and hired Jim Crawford to be Store Manager. With extensive experience in retail, and a love of cooking, Crawford has partnered with Brown to be one of the “two Jims” running the store. A handful of part-time employees, many of them local and all with a love of cooking, assist them.

Crawford says he is thoroughly enjoying his job, and responded to our question about being part of a franchise. “As a spice shop, being part of a franchise is the best of both worlds. Having a central spice factory in Denver that serves 31 stores [nationwide] allows us to have a consistent supply of properly-sourced and freshly-ground spices for our customers.

“On the other hand, being locally owned and operated allows us both to support our local community, and to select unique local products and brands to carry in our store.”

Owner Brown is passionate about spices, and has many tips about the use and storage of Savory’s products. Spices are purchased in bulk from Denver, and are then packaged into small quantities – 2.2 oz. in spice packages, or into jars of larger quantities. He says the store is “customer centered”, to provide the spice and amount the customer needs.

Gift packets of three different spices can be purchased for $15, and samples are available with a 25% discount if one returns to buy something sampled. Oils, vinegars, condiments, BBQ spices, and fruit spreads (with less sugar than preserves) from Oregon towns are also for sale.

Anyone who makes a purchase can be signed up to receive occasional e-mails with tantalizing recipes and information about the spices used. 

During the Holidays, the store made contributions of money and spices to various organizations, and currently there are jars in the store where customers can make donations to a variety of nonprofits – to Central City Concern, the HALO Trust, Oregon Dog Rescue, World Central Kitchen, and the MESD Outdoor School.

Store hours are: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and 11 to 5 on Sunday.  Curb pickup is available. COVID-safe practices are observed in the store. 

For more information, call 503/928-3099, or e-mail sellwood@savoryspice.com, or visit online – http://www.savoryspiceshop.com/sellwood



“Keeper Coffee” offers house-made pastries, quality coffee, and teas – and emphasizes “fostering community, hospitality, and service”. Staff shown (from left): Astrid Angell, Brittany Ruff (owner), Missy Guardiola, and Ryan Huff.
“Keeper Coffee” offers house-made pastries, quality coffee, and teas – and emphasizes “fostering community, hospitality, and service”. Staff shown (from left): Astrid Angell, Brittany Ruff (owner), Missy Guardiola, and Ryan Huff. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Eastside coffee shop moves to Woodstock, at Holgate and 41st

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

On a bright sunny Saturday morning in mid-December, after long days of gray skies, rain, and pandemic fatigue, people were walking and driving from all corners of the metro area to experience a new coffee shop in the historic “Old Towne Crier” building (also the former location of Grandma’s Restaurant) at 4515 S.E. 41st Avenue.

“Keeper Coffee” opened on December 7th after moving from its previous location on S.E. Taylor at 2nd Avenue.  Surprisingly enough, as the line continued to form inside the shop (with distancing and masks), people identified themselves as having come from as far away as Canby, Beaverton, and Gresham.

Many said they’d learned about the shop on social media or by word of mouth, and had come to see what seemed to be a “cute” space. Decorated with vintage mirrors, small marble-top tables with cast iron bases, and dried flower arrangements, the shop’s décor and original wooden floors are in the old-fashioned style of the original “Old Towne Crier”.  Another attraction online was the discussion of welcoming and friendly owners and employees.

Claire from Beaverton remarked that she’d seen a picture and video of the shop on social media and decided to check it out. Danielle Stipe from Canby said a friend had told her about the shop, so she decided to drive to Southeast Portland to see it. 

There were also people from nearby who had walked to the shop. Tanya McCoy, a Woodstock resident since 1997, was there with her teenage son Gage and his friend Elliott. Tanya shared her excitement about finally having a new coffee shop to replace the former Starbucks that had closed on the corner of Holgate and Chavez Boulevards [formerly 39th]. 

“This morning we were walking up near Woodstock Boulevard on S.E. 41st and a young woman walking on the other side of the street yelled at us, ‘Hey, excuse me, have you tried the new coffee shop on 41st and Holgate?’ so we came to see it.  I have waited a long time to have a business open in this building that would have the old neighborhood feel. And this is it!”

Megan Turvey, who also lives in Woodstock, remarked, “They are one of the first businesses of hopefully a few more to open in the ‘Towne Crier’ building which, as many folks know, has been a work in progress over the years. It is very exciting to have new businesses in this northwest part of the neighborhood.”

The shop that first opened in the basement of the structure, this past October, is Wyrd Leatherworks and Meadery. They kept historic features intact, put stills in the back and rebuilt the kitchen. The medieval bar and leather shop – with wood carvings, fur pelts, and mead made with Bee Local honey – posts information and hours online: http://www.wyrdleatherandmead.com

The owner of this latest enterprise in the building, “Keeper Coffee”, is Brittany Huff – a Lents neighborhood resident – who told THE BEE that this will be her second year of owning a coffee shop. “Believe it or not, I found out about the Towne Crier space on Craigslist!” She and her husband Ryan chose the name Keeper because “Ryan and I often say ‘you're a keeper’ and it stuck when we were thinking up names.”

Huff has five employees in addition to herself. “Ryan, Star Obryan [an employee], and I are the core Keeper members, and have known each other since our teens. Star and I met at age sixteen in Perth, Australia, and have been joined at the hip ever since. I met Ryan one year later, and we married young. While living in Atlanta, Georgia, we both worked in coffee.”     

The shop’s coffee is sourced from “Coava”. Huff says popular choices are Rose Cardamon Latte and Vanilla Latte. Tea selections are from Aesthete Tea, a woman-owned tea company in Multnomah Village. One Stripe Chai and hot chocolate are also offered. All coffee syrups and pastries are made in-house. 

“Schnecken, or ‘sticky bun’, is my grandmother's recipe that I’ve adapted over the years.  She would not have liked that I added pecans instead of walnuts,” Ruff remarked jokingly.  “Our chocolate chip cookie is large and crispy on the outside and chewy in the middle – we sell out of these almost every day, as well as our hand pies that we change the flavors of, seasonally.”

Huff expressed her vision for their business: “I truly hope to be a neighborhood staple – for the community to rely on us for a warm welcome and hot coffee to start their day right. I plan to be here for the long haul, and really look forward to cultivating relationships with our neighbors, and developing a stronger menu that will eventually include more brunch options.”

The shop is open 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. daily, but check the website and social media to see any updates, as well as photos and videos – http://www.keepercoffee.com   

Huff says, “During COVID we are only accepting card payments. Please wear a mask while ordering and shopping.”

And, for more information about Coava Coffee Roasters – the makers of the coffee they serve – http://www.coavacoffee.com/our-story



It’s a new name and signage for Sellwood’s once feline-only veterinary clinic on S.E. 13th Avenue – which is now accepting canine patients, too.
It’s a new name and signage for Sellwood’s once feline-only veterinary clinic on S.E. 13th Avenue – which is now accepting canine patients, too. (Photo by Paige Wallace)

Sellwood’s Cat Hospital starts treating dogs, too

By PAIGE WALLACE
For THE BEE

Many businesses have changed focus during the coronavirus pandemic, but few so significantly as Sellwood’s formerly cats-only veterinary hospital, which recently began welcoming dogs into its practice as well.

The Cat Hospital of Portland has treated feline patients since 2004. In December, the clinic changed its name to Cat & Dog Hospital of Portland, putting up new signs outside its main entrance at 8065 S.E. 13th Avenue, while also hiring an additional veterinarian, and undergoing a remodel.

Hospital Administrator Wendy Stillwell told THE BEE that the plan includes keeping cats and dogs apart as much as possible. They’ll use separate entrances, and occupy opposite sides of the clinic. Cats will be seen on certain days of the week, and dogs on the other days – except for emergencies. Stillwell said the clinic will at all times have at least one feline vet and one canine vet on hand for urgent care situations.

The clinic’s three established veterinarians will continue to focus on caring for cats. Now, Dr. Steve Kubelun, DVM, has joined the practice as Medical Director, and will handle the new canine patients. He brings 27 years of small-animal veterinary experience.

“The Cat Hospital already has a pretty amazing reputation for the level of care they have historically delivered for cats,” Kubelun said. “Our goal is to keep that bar as high as possible for taking care of dogs, as well.”

He’s certified in the Fear Free handling techniques already in use at the clinic, which involves gentle touch, calming surroundings, and giving attention to body language in order to ease animals’ anxiety and stress.

The 5,000-square-foot hospital is undergoing a remodel to accommodate both species. Stillwell explained that a rarely-used boarding area near the front has become the canine exam rooms, while a spare bathroom and offices at the back were turned into three new feline exam rooms. Cats will enter from the parking lot in the rear, and dogs will come in from the sidewalk out front. A door will separate the two sections.

“Practicing keeping the kitties in a calm and quiet area has always been our first priority. We’re hoping to bring that same Fear Free [experience] to the dogs,” Stillwell elaborated. “Hopefully it’ll be a less stressful veterinary visit for all of them.”

Existing clients who had been bringing their cats to the clinic prior to the change posted mixed opinions on the Cat & Dog Hospital’s Facebook page. One respondent was happy about now being able to refer dog owners to the clinic, while several others expressed concerns.

Melissa Perkins lives on Milwaukie Avenue and has been a client of the clinic for more than seven years, where she said her family’s two cats received “kind and attentive care”. She initially questioned the change, but has since reconsidered.

“My first reaction was disappointment. I like taking our cats to what feels like a special cat club,” she said. “But I quickly realized it was because I just like the idea of it. One of my cats is going to be curious and interested and one is going to be stressed and peeved, no matter what the clientele. I’d rather my local vet stay in business!”

The decision to extend canine care came out of the coronavirus lockdowns. Stillwell remembers noticing a trend: Family after family adopting a new “pandemic puppy”, but then struggling to find a vet who could see their dog.

“The waiting list to get into any veterinarian was four weeks,” Stillwell remarked. “Demand for more veterinary care in this area was apparent, so we decided to invite the dogs in.”

Kubelun, who recently adopted his own pandemic puppy, considers the change an inclusive move to serve a wider section of the community, and to support Southeast neighbors who’ve added new animals to their households.

“The pets we see are part of the family, and we try and take care of the whole family as one unit,” he said. “All the pets included!”



Christie Gryphon, owner of the Rose City Coffee Shop a short distance south of Powell Boulevard on Milwaukie Avenue, stands by the front window destroyed by vandals who broke into her store on January 4th.
Christie Gryphon, owner of the Rose City Coffee Shop a short distance south of Powell Boulevard on Milwaukie Avenue, stands by the front window destroyed by vandals who broke into her store on January 4th. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Brooklyn’s Rose City Coffee Shop vandalized on January 4

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

The Rose City Coffee House at 3370 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue in the Brooklyn neighborhood started the New Year by being vandalized. In spite of a notice posted at the front of the shop, “No Money Left on Premises Overnight”, early Monday, January 4, one or more vandals smashed in one of the front plate glass windows, entered, but stole little or nothing.

It appeared to be the same sort of purposeless vandalism that led to broken windows and businesses here and there in Southeast recently, and the burning of newsstands – one for THE BEE and two for the Portland Tribune – on Woodstock Boulevard, as well as a car on S.E. 72nd, overnight on January 6. Two banks in Westmoreland have had large windows broken recently, as well.

Shattered glass indoors and out greeted Rose City Coffee Shop owner Christie Gryphon when she arrived in the morning to open up. “I knew there had been a break-in, since the alarm went off at 3:45 a.m.,” she told THE BEE.

By evening, the broken glass had been swept up and a piece of plywood covered the destroyed southwest corner window. Gryphon remarked that this had been the fourth break-in at the shop within 13 months.

Like many shops damaged during the pandemic, she expects her insurance rates to go up – and increasingly, business insurance does not cover broken windows – but the customers have been very supportive, she said.

Meantime, and on a brighter note, the store is offering more than just coffee these days. The shop also features an array of live houseplants for sale, in ceramic pots around the shop.

Amy Aiello, who has lived in the neighborhood for 13 years, sells these plants and terrariums (which can evoke the forest, desert, beach, or meadow) through her business, “Artemisia”, which is the Latin name for “sagebrush”.

Aiello told THE BEE, “I was raised in a family of naturalists and artists, and enjoy welcoming folks to the natural world,” she says. “Artemis is the goddess of the hunt and also the part of our psyche that connects with nature.

“I was originally located at 110 S.E. 28th Avenue but I moved here, where there’s more display space. My website – http://www.collagewithnature.com – also offers terrarium supplies, and offers virtual workshops on making terrariums, Kokedama (Japanese bonsai-style hanging plants), and air plants for home, office or gifts.”

Aiello's website also offers virtual fragrance classes which encourage students to learn about natural fragrances and to create perfumes that appeal to their personal nature. “We also sell a Terrarium Craft book, authored by myself and Kate Bryant, which was among the New York Top 100 books of 2011,” she reports.

The Artemisia plant displays at Rose City Coffee received only minor damage in the break-in, and they remain on display and for sale there.







BUSINESS BRIEFS


The AHB speaker on February 18th is Mark Ripkey – a local consultant who focuses on small businesses and  solo’preneurs. With a Masters in National Security and Strategic Studies, he helps business owners define who they are and where they are going, enroute to profitability.
The AHB speaker on February 18th is Mark Ripkey – a local consultant who focuses on small businesses and solo’preneurs. With a Masters in National Security and Strategic Studies, he helps business owners define who they are and where they are going, enroute to profitability.

Feb. AHB meeting – “Communicating thru your Mission Statement”: In February’s monthly meeting of Southeast’s Association of Home Businesses, on February 18 at 6:30 p.m., Mark Ripkey leads a discussion for small businesses and freelancers of using Vision and Mission Statements to build your business – “if we don’t know who we are, it is difficult to communicate to our customers and stakeholders what we can do for them.” Networking time too. During the pandemic, these third-Thursday monthly meetings are held virtually, on ZOOM, open to anyone interested, and there is no charge. However, to attend, you’ll need the ZOOM link. E-mail your RSVP to – communications@ahboregon.org – or, call 503/232-2326.

WCBA’s Annual Meeting is “virtual” on February 10: The Woodstock Community Business Association, which serves both the Woodstock and Brentwood-Darlington neighborhoods, will hold its annual meeting 5:30-7 p.m. on Wednesday, February 10th, at 5:30 p.m. There will be networking between local businesspeople on how 2020 went, and expectations for the future – as well as the annual Board election. Open to all businesspeople in both neighborhoods and anyone else who’d like to be included – you need not be a member of WCBA to attend, but only current dues-paying members will be eligible to vote in the election. The ZOOM link will be sent to everyone who RSVPs at – http://forms.gle/UgehwSPAnXT8uasb9 – and, for more information, please e-mail woodstockcommunitybiz@gmail.com



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