THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


“Good Garbage” provides hauling of all kinds of discards, and “Alive MMA” offers mixed martial arts classes, both at S.E. 56th and Woodstock. Bill Bradley, kneeling, the founder of both, is shown with two Good Garbage employees – Jay Kittelson at left, and John Hurlman at right; Southeast Portland, Oregon
“Good Garbage” provides hauling of all kinds of discards, and “Alive MMA” offers mixed martial arts classes, both at S.E. 56th and Woodstock. Bill Bradley, kneeling, the founder of both, is shown with two Good Garbage employees – Jay Kittelson at left, and John Hurlman at right. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Woodstock man with two businesses ‘aims to help the community’

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

You may have seen the big white GOOD GARBAGE truck in your neighborhood, with “Junk Removal, Hauling, Recycling” in large letters on the side of the vehicle.

Just what exactly is “good garbage”? For the company, located at 5607 S.E. Woodstock Boulevard, it is anything you need to have hauled away. It could be unwanted junk, debris, furniture, or something else that might be recyclable. 

“Fast and affordable junk removal, emphasizing recycling and donation of reusable goods”, states the company’s website. That includes a long list of possibilities, including carpet, construction debris, couches, doors and windows, hot tubs, rental property mess, metals, wood and lumber, Styrofoam, old BBQ grills, appliances, and electronics – including TVs, computers, and monitors.

“Good Garbage” was started nine years ago by Woodstock resident Bill Bradley, who is also the founder of “Alive MMA” – next door to Good Garbage, at the same address.

It all began while he was auditing courses at Reed College over thirty years ago; that was when in 1989 he began teaching mixed martial arts on the college campus in the Sports Center.

He followed that experience by buying the 8,000-square-foot storefront at 56th and Woodstock, and creating Alive Mixed Martial Arts [MMA]. In non-pandemic times, with a staff of 27 instructors, the gym offers classes in Crossfit, Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai, Parkinson’s Boxing, Kickboxing, Kids’ Play, Kids’ Jiu Jitsu, Muay Thai Fundamentals, Self Defense/MMA, and Yoga.

“Sometimes we give 101 classes a week, using the five different rooms in the building,” he remarks to THE BEE.

Then, after founding Alive MMA – and during the recession in 2008 – he started “Good Garbage” as a way to provide employment for athletes and gym members who were losing their jobs. The hauling company now serves a radius within about twenty miles of the Woodstock neighborhood.

That endeavor continues until the present time, and he still welcomes unemployed people to work for Good Garbage. And today, in the time of the COVID-19 coronavirus, Good Garbage is still busy with its four fulltime and two part time employees hauling unwanted junk and discards, and recycling what they can for businesses and offices that may have shut down, or which are temporarily shuttered and need to re-locate or clean out.

Bradley’s principles for the “Alive Business Family”, as he calls his companies, are “health, truth, contribution, and community.” The “community” principle is especially important to him during this time of COVID-19, when the gym is closed. 

“During these pandemic times, I am trying to activate any neighbors or laid-off people who are not doing anything, to volunteer, and help their community,” he explains.  “I want our people and employees, or members of any business, to be assisting others, whether it is helping a neighbor plant a garden, or delivering food [or other useful tasks].”           

Bradley appears to be an intense thinker, and says he sees no harm in arguing with people to get to a truth.  While conversing, he can be philosopher, engaging in discussions of social behavior or psychology. 

He says he has helped military veterans with PTSD by teaching them to control emotions and impulses through “self-regulation”, and guiding them to come to peace with their demons by caring for their community, or working out their feelings in other constructive ways. He refers to his martial arts business as the Alive MMA and “Community Resilience Center”.

Bradley sums up his multiple interests by saying, “As well as being a mixed martial arts teacher, my role is haul and recycle what can be recycled, and to re-purpose the unemployed.”

To learn more, go online to – http://www.alivemma.dreamhosters.com – or to – http://www.goodgarbagepdx.com

Alternatively, you can call Good Garbage at 503/333-7590, and Alive MMA at 503/740-3004.

This trio is, from left, the owner’s best friend from Thailand; Chef Charchrist Prompong; and the owner of the new Thai restaurant, Somjai Saejieng; Southeast Portland, Oregon
This trio is, from left, the owner’s best friend from Thailand; Chef Charchrist Prompong; and the owner of the new Thai restaurant, Somjai Saejieng. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

New Thai restaurant opens on Holgate Blvd.

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

A Thai restaurant opened at S.E. 28th and Holgate at the end of March – which turned out not to be the best of times to open a new restaurant. The owner of “PDX Thai Dining”, Somjai Saejieng, tells THE BEE she has 20 years’ experience as a food cart operator, but this is her first time owning a restaurant.

The business, which has moved into the former Bird & Bear Restaurant space on the northeast corner of the intersection, seats about 32 indoors, and 12 at tables outdoors. Due to coronavirus concerns, the restaurant currently is only open for food to go, but – with plenty of good reviews from neighbors – PDX Thai hopes soon to open its doors for dine-in customers. In the kitchen is Chef Charchrist Prompong.

The restaurant offers appetizers, soups, salads, stir-fry & curries with jasmine white rice. So far, noodle selections are the favorites, with a choice of chicken, beef, pork, tofu or veggies. They offer Pad Thai, Pad Se-Ew, Pad Kee-Mao, Yakisoba, Rad-Nah, and chicken noodles. Specialties are crab fried rice, grilled salmon with teriyaki sauce, stir-fried eggplant, Panang salmon, and duck curry. A selection of beverages and side orders complete the menu.

For now, Saejieng says, “We’re open Tuesday through Friday for to-go lunches from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Our to-go dinners are offered Tuesdays through Fridays from 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Weekend hours are noon till 9 p.m., both Saturdays and Sundays. Phone us at 971/420-2829; or come by and pick up a menu.”



“Hip Chicks do Wine” owner Laurie Lewis says all their wines are made right here, on the border of the Reed and Brooklyn neighborhoods, in the shadow of the Holgate viaduct over the Brooklyn railroad yard; Southeast Portland, Oregon
“Hip Chicks do Wine” owner Laurie Lewis says all their wines are made right here, on the border of the Reed and Brooklyn neighborhoods, in the shadow of the Holgate viaduct over the Brooklyn railroad yard – and it’s all available right now, for pickup or delivery. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Reed’s ‘Hip Chicks do Wine’ provides home delivery

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Instead of celebrating with a party their second decade as a working “urban winery” and shop, in the Reed neighborhood, “Hip Chicks do Wine” instead recognized COVID-19 concerns, and pivoted their business to include delivery.

“In the beginning, it took us about a year of driving all around Portland looking at different locations to find the one we wanted,” recalled owner Laurie Lewis, while preparing to make a round of home deliveries on a Saturday in May.

“Tucked back in here between the Reed and Brooklyn neighborhoods has been great; we do have folks who live close enough to walk or ride their bike down here, and probably 50% of our Wine Club lives in one of the four ZIP Codes surrounding the winery,” Lewis told THE BEE. “We've been making wine here for twenty years, so the year 2020 will mark our twenty-first harvest.”

Currently they’re offering curbside pickup of wine orders in the afternoons, as well as free home delivery throughout the Portland metro area with orders of four bottles or more – but they will deliver a single bottle of their wine for a nominal fee, Lewis told us. “And, we’ve expanded our offerings to more than just the wine we make here in our winery; we now also offer cheese and charcuterie packages, and fresh flowers.

“People are loving our home delivery service; in fact, it’ll probably be a service that we continue to offer after COVID-19 is over,” Lewis commented.

Recently, after delivering a couple of bottles of wine and a plant from Gifford’s Florist to a customer in the neighborhood, a 6- or 7- year old-child came to the door with mom.

“As I was walking back to my car the child asked what had been delivered,” Lewis recalled. “Upon hearing ‘wine and a plant’, the child asked, ‘Why did you get WINE?’ To which the mom replied, “Because I really need a glass of wine right now!”

Learn more online – http://www.hipchicksdowine.com


Chef Ricki Berduo is the owner of the newest sushi spot in the Sellwood-Westmoreland neighborhood, “PokeBox”; Southeast Portland, Oregon
Chef Ricki Berduo is the owner at the newest sushi spot in the Sellwood-Westmoreland neighborhood, “PokeBox” – at 7414 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Newest sushi restaurant offers to-go in Westmoreland

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

For those in the mood for sushi, “PokeBox” opened early this year at 7414 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue, at Knapp Street, in Westmoreland – and is currently offering sushi to go, open Tuesday through Friday from 11:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

Owner Ricki Berduo, who has spent 16 years as a sushi chef, tells THE BEE, “We opened with a staff of five, but currently – due to COVID-19 coronavirus ‘social distancing’ restrictions – we’ve limited our hours to four days a week, and the size of our staff to just two. However, we’re slowly coming back, and we hope to see everyone soon!”

PokeBox has fresh fish delivered every other day from True World Foods. “We offer ten different signature rolls featuring salmon, tuna, crab, scallops, and veggie styles,” says Berduo. “So far, favorites among our customers have been Sumo, Baked Salmon, and Mango Tango. Our cold appetizer favorites have been Tuna and Yellowtail Poke, Hamachi Carpaccio, and Salmon Bites with Truffle oil.

“Hot appetizers include rice, homemade Miso Soup, and steamed Edamame with garlic and soy butter. We also serve Nigiri, Sashimi, Moriwase, and a selection of saki, beer, wine, and sodas.”

Stop in, or order by phone – 503/519-9586. Orders can be picked up in person or delivered by Grubhub or Uber.



At left is Bob Howard, Artichoke Music’s Executive Director; at right is Artichoke’s new Director of House Productions, Lindsie Feathers Shepherd; Southeast Portland, Oregon
At left is Bob Howard, Artichoke Music’s Executive Director; at right is Artichoke’s new Director of House Productions, Lindsie Feathers Shepherd. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Nonprofit Artichoke Music enters ‘Phase One’ reopening

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Bob Howard, Executive Director at Artichoke Music at 2007 S.E. Powell Boulevard, says the nonprofit is emerging from the pandemic quarantine with optimism for the future. “We were gratified by the response to our first-ever online Town Hall, and the warm welcome to our first live-stream events.” [See – http://www.youtube.com/artichokemusic]

He continued, “We're in the early planning stages of re-opening consistent with Multnomah County's Phase 1 status. We're reopening for some activities. Our first Studio ‘live-inside’ production of Tom May's River City Folk aired on Facebook on June 20 at 2 p.m. His guest was Haley Johnson from Café Artichoke.

“Meanwhile, we’re offering classes online, and all regular teachers are back. For the first time, we're offering the first international class from Dublin taught by acclaimed storyteller and singer Macdara Yeates.

“After mid-June's pause in reopening the economy,” Howard went on, “Oregon's entire art and culture community has been severely impacted by the pandemic. We’ve been working with the newly-formed Independent Venue Coalition to decide how to save our venues using Federal Covid Relief Funds allocated to the state, under a program titled ‘Life Support for Venues’. This Fund would pay basic monthly bare-bones expenses for Oregon's dedicated independent venues whose entire income derives from ticketed performances.”

Artichoke’s new Director of House Productions is Lindsie Feathers Shepherd: “Artichoke Cares will be our charitable foundation to help our venues in the music community who have been adversely affected by COVID-19,” she told THE BEE.







BUSINESS BRIEFS


After the initial tree removal, demolition commenced on the former Westmoreland Dairy Queen building; Southeast Portland, Oregon
After the initial tree removal, demolition commenced on the former Westmoreland Dairy Queen building on the weekend of June 13. (Photo courtesy Vickie Walsh of Fat Albert’s)
New landscaping at former Dairy Queen site: Construction has begun on what will be a new Chase Bank on the lot at S.E. Tolman and Milwaukie Avenue where the Dairy Queen used to be. Seeing some tree removal underway, a disappointed reader contacted THE BEE on June 11. We contacted David Schoellhamer, Chair of the SMILE Land Use Committee, for details of what’s been authorized there, and he quoted the city permit: “They are putting in a ten-foot-wide landscape buffer along the east property line, and preserving five trees. ‘The applicant has taken steps to increase the functionality of the site, and bring some elements into conformance with current standards, such as the 10-foot, L3 high-screen landscape buffer along the east side of the site, adjacent to a residential site; new perimeter parking lot landscaping along the west property line; and more robust landscaping along the north property line. . .  The landscaping on the site will be significantly increased over current conditions, and will exceed the minimum 15 percent of landscaped area. The proposal will plant ten medium trees and one large tree, in addition to retaining five existing trees along the east property line. The large tree, a London Planetree, will be planted on the new landscape bed just north of the curb cut on S.E. Milwaukie Avenue, providing shade and softening of both the parking area and the stacking lane’.”

Windermere Real Estate Donates $690,000 to local food banks:
Inspired by a matching donation of up to $250,000 from the Windermere Foundation, the Windermere Real Estate offices in 10 states – including prominent efforts from the Inner Southeast “Windermere Moreland” office on S.E. Bybee Boulevard – recently raised $690,000 for food banks in their communities, exceeding the original goal of the fundraising challenge of $500,000. The company reported, “The emergency fundraising campaign was accomplished in just 13 days in response to a drastic increase in the need for food assistance nationwide, during the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.”

Sellwood Attorney Jorden Piraino is the presenter at the Assn. of Home Businesses online ZOOM meeting on July 16.
Sellwood Attorney Jorden Piraino is the presenter at the Assn. of Home Businesses online ZOOM meeting on July 16 starting at 6:30 p.m.; RSVP to attend.

Local lawyer has help and advice for small and solo businesses: Sellwood Attorney Jorden Piraino is the speaker at the July virtual ZOOM meeting of the Association of Home Businesses. Jorden says, “Small businesses need big protection without large expense. Of all business ownerships, small business may be the most complex. Most entrepreneurs start out on their own with little support and generally little experience managing all aspects of a business.” He will focus on business formation and maintenance, estate planning, trust administration, and probate, and will answer questions. Piraino assists business clients with creating the initial entity, contract drafting, acquisitions, and sales. Don’t miss this conversation, along with the usual camaraderie, at the July 16th meeting of the AHB – online at 6:30 p.m. If you’d like to join this online meeting, and all are welcome, please email your request to – communications@ahboregon.org. Folks who RSVP will be given a ZOOM link and password prior to the event. No charge for attending; but without your RSVP you cannot obtain the link to join the meeting.

Venture Portland backs off – a bit: We reported last issue that “Venture Portland”, a business-association-supporting nonprofit overseen by the City of Portland and Commissioner Chloe Eudaly, had decided to dismiss its Board of Directors, composed of representatives of the member Portland Business Associations. The WCBA delegate to Venture Portland, Stacey Lennon, reported at the June WCBA virtual meeting that there had been an unofficial meeting of many of those disenfranchised former Venture Portland Board Members to discuss this, with the Hawthorne Business Association taking the lead and meeting with Venture Portland. As a result, Venture Portland has reinstated all its Board Members for another year, and Board Meetings will now take place monthly, instead of quarterly, to make it more of a working Board. However, Venture Portland still intends that its new Executive Committee should constitute the organization’s overall leadership – and it wants its meetings to be private, in violation of the Venture Portland bylaws. “So there are still issues,” she said.



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