THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


Baristas David Dunnaway and Kymi Parker serve coffee at Woodstock Café, in a location previously occupied by First Cup Coffee – on S.E. 41st Avenue at Woodstock Boulevard.
Baristas David Dunnaway and Kymi Parker serve coffee at Woodstock Café, in a location previously occupied by First Cup Coffee – on S.E. 41st Avenue at Woodstock Boulevard. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

New coffee shop opens in Woodstock’s ‘First Cup’ space

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

Set back on the northeast corner of Woodstock Boulevard at S.E. 41st Avenue, in the location of the former “First Cup Coffee”, is a new coffee and tea shop, “Woodstock Café”.  It is owned, and recently remodeled, by Katherine Harris – who is known for founding “Upper Left Roasters” in Ladd’s Addition.

The Harris family has had several restaurants and coffee shops in Portland over the years. As the daughter of chefs Jim and Kristin Harris, Katherine has a strong culinary foundation, and six years of experience in the restaurant and coffee roasting business.

Woodstock Café barista David Dunnaway mentioned to THE BEE, “I like to say we are in the third wave of coffee shops – ones that are paying specific attention to modern open space [décor]”.

Kymi Parker, another barista, described the new café this way: “We are the grandchildren of coffee shops of ‘yore’. We offer specialty coffee, focusing on flavor and sustainability.”

The café offers “Upper Left Roasters” coffee, which is sourced from Central and South America and Africa, and is roasted at their facility a couple of miles north in Ladd’s Addition. Upper Left Roasters seeks out coffee that can be used with the espresso, pour-over, and drip methods of brewing. Their attention to the weather patterns, soil health, and environment in the different countries where their coffee is purchased allows for a stable relationship with their coffee suppliers for the future.

Barista Dunnaway says variety is valued by Woodstock Café. “We try to change [our coffees] frequently to keep it interesting. It is almost all medium roast.” 

On a recent sunny September morning Avery Van Duzer, a Reed College graduate, OHSU researcher, and Woodstock resident, was waiting outside the shop with her canine companion while a friend ordered coffee. 

“I can’t have dairy, so I’m really excited that all of their pastries are vegan. That’s what keeps me coming back. Plus, I like this coffee better than others, and the people are always really friendly.”

Woodstock Café also offers a couple of gluten-free pastries. All pastries are from Shoofly. On the menu are avocado toast and lox bagel sandwiches. Further remodeling is underway to prepare for more food options in the future. And teas are available, too – from “True Tea”, a Portland women-owned company founded earlier this year and co-owned by Harris.  It sources its teas from various countries around the world.

In non-COVID-19 times there will be ample seating inside, as well as the three tables and benches outside on a deck that is always shaded. The large black and white wall painting inside the shop is by Jess Mudgett, a Portland artist.

Hours for the café are 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday–Friday; 8 to 4 on Saturdays and Sundays.

The new “SymbiOp Garden Shop” at 3454 S.E. Powell Boulevard replaces Naomi’s Farm Supply at that location.
The new “SymbiOp Garden Shop” at 3454 S.E. Powell Boulevard replaces Naomi’s Farm Supply at that location. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

New garden shop replaces Naomi’s on Powell Boulevard

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Gardeners who mourned the loss of Naomi’s Farm Supply Store at 3454 S.E. Powell Boulevard will be pleased to learn that a new “ecological garden shop” – “SymbiOp”, a worker-owned company – will be the new tenant in that space just west of DeNicola’s Italian Restaurant.

SymbiOp Garden Shop, which opened on October 1, aims to be a one-stop shop for all ecological gardeners and homesteaders.

Recent murals along all the outside walls give a hint of the sort of things the shop will concentrate on. From mushrooms, morels, and ferns on the east side – to flowers, a ladybug, a hummingbird, and a watering can on the west side – SymbiOp will focus on plants and critters in your garden. The mural along the north side of the building features a robin and a blue-jay, as well as acorns, flowers, and blueberries, indicating the wildlife that will enjoy your ecological provender.

SymbiOp spokesman J. T. Yu tells THE BEE, “The shop is a natural extension of our ecological landscaping business. We want to use our expertise to make ecological gardening even more accessible to the greater community. We'll have native and edible plants, house plants, seeds, chicken and duck food, soil, and compost. We'll also have garden tools and clothing, local arts and gifts, workshops and classes, and much more.

It’s a worker-owned company, run by a variety of employees and working-class families. The shop offers plenty of parking, and is open daily from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. Learn more online – http://gardenshop.symbiop.com



One of the local artists often appearing at the new informal “Saturday Market” in the Brooklyn neighborhood is Madeline Banta – here showing and offering for sale some of her watercolor-and-ink drawings.
One of the local artists often appearing at the new informal “Saturday Market” in the Brooklyn neighborhood is Madeline Banta – here showing and offering for sale some of her watercolor-and-ink drawings. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

‘Saturday Market’ for artists taking shape in Brooklyn

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

Over the past couple of months, a “Saturday Artists’ Flea Market” has been developing along the sidewalk in front of “Know Thy Food”, 3434 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue. Artists often tell how hard it is for individuals to get exposure for, and sell, their work – especially with the Holidays coming up.

As a result, Jocelyn Wheeler at Brooklyn’s organic grocery store decided to create a “Saturday Market” experience for artists seeking a platform for their wares. Ned Hasbrouck, manager of the store, remarks that the project has been going on since August. Sometimes, he says, there are over a dozen artists set up along the sidewalk, or in the space provided by the gym next door.

“They bring their own tents and tables to set up on Saturdays between about noon and 5 p.m.,” he tells THE BEE. “If the weather is poor, they can set up indoors here, or just not come. The number and type of crafters changes all the time, but there’s always an interesting mix here to explore.”

Hasbrouck describes some of the artistry that has been displayed in the informal artist’s market so far: “There’s been vintage clothing, T-shirts, hats, jewelry, cards, framed and unframed artwork, vanilla extract kits, stickers, pottery, purses, toys, soaps, and natural body care products.

“It’s a great way for new artists to gain exposure; most of them offer business cards along with their wares. We are also pleased to serve food, coffee, drinks, and our regular products, during business hours.”

“Know Thy Food” has a history of supporting local artists through presentations, music, and classes. During the COVID-19 pandemic, when many crafters have had to remain indoors, the new Saturday Flea Market offers a way to focus the community on local talent. People interested in trying out the opportunity of the informal “Artists’ Market” are encouraged to contact Chairman Jocelyn Wheeler at 503/206-5766.




BUSINESS BRIEFS


The newly painted street parking space in front of Westmoreland’s Fat Albert’s Breakfast Café is visible under the street dining tables, which were moved back when the paint dried.
The newly painted street parking space in front of Westmoreland’s Fat Albert’s Breakfast Café is visible under the street dining tables, which were moved back when the paint dried.

Painted intersections – and now, painted parking spaces: The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), which initially allowed stores and especially restaurants to apply to use adjacent parking spaces for serving customers during the pandemic, recently invited those with a permit for parking spaces to consider having a street painting made in their parking space, and Vickie Walsh – owner of Fat Albert’s Breakfast Café, at 6668 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue – was among one of the first to apply for one. In mid-September, with the help of the City Repair Project (the Sellwood folks who originated Portland’s painted intersections) doing the work. Both she and her customers express delight with the result. And, whenever in-the-street dining comes to an end, Westmoreland will have at least one painted parking space to park in!


Robb Hatley and Shell Tain co-present a program at the October AHB meeting which is designed to change your money thinking, and make you more successful.
Robb Hatley and Shell Tain co-present a program at the October AHB meeting which is designed to change your money thinking, and make you more successful.
Attitudes about money may be holding you back: The Association of Home Businesses’ favorite money gurus Robb Hatley and Shell Tain unite for a timely program for individuals and small businesspeople called “Flipping the Coin – a different way to view money”. They explain, “We will dig into why we all have such odd beliefs about money, and what the unfortunate consequences are. We’ll explain how to shift those beliefs – and to experience the real benefits of having a different ‘money thought process’.” At this month’s “Third Thursday Night” ZOOM meeting of the Association of Home Businesses on October 21 at 6 p.m., this pair will help you unshackle yourself from unconscious money assumptions that are holding you back! Everyone welcome – and at no charge, during the pandemic. To RSVP and get the ZOOM coordinates, e-mail: Communications@ahboregon.org. Learn more, online – http://www.ahboregon.org.

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