THE BEE
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS

THE BEE's "want ads" are named "Community Classifieds".

An important innovation is that classified ads placed in THE BEE may also be available at the special Community Classifieds website, at the HotLink below!

In addition, Community Classifieds now offer the additional service of in-column photographs of vehicles and homes for sale. The photos can not only appear in THE BEE, but on the website as well.

Community Classifieds appear each month in THE BEE, and can also reach up to a half million additional readers by being published in any combination of the 24 other newspapers in the "Community Newspapers" group, including the weekly Clackamas Review, Oregon City News, Lake Oswego Review, and West Linn Tidings; the monthly Sherwood Gazette, and Southwest Community Connection; the twice-weekly Gresham Outlook and Portland Tribune; and the other newspapers in the group.

To get information or place your classified ad by phone, here's the number to call: 503/620-7355!

Now, click on the logo directly below, and read the Greenlight "Community Classifieds"!

Community Classifieds, want ads
 
 

INNER SOUTHEAST PORTLAND'S

BUSINESS NEWS!


Erik Tonkin – no relation to car dealer Ron Tonkin – owner of Sellwood Cycle Repair, reports that bicycle repairs “at the door” have been brisk during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Erik Tonkin – no relation to car dealer Ron Tonkin – owner of Sellwood Cycle Repair, reports that bicycle repairs “at the door” have been brisk during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Coronavirus gives supply problems to local bicycle retailers

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

More people than ever are riding bicycles during the COVID-19 pandemic – some masked, some unmasked to feel the breeze on their faces – all to get exercise, and relief from staying at home.

Bicycle businesses are therefore busier than usual, responding to calls and requests for repairs and sales – but, unfortunately, they can’t always get what the customer needs.

James Emond, owner of “The Missing Link” bike shop on S.E. Woodstock Boulevard at 47th Avenue, says, “It’s been very busy, but we are out of bikes and some parts. It’s hard for the supply side to keep up with the demand.”

Randall Magahay, a Woodstock resident who has worked at various Bike Gallery locations in sales and repairs for thirty-three years, is currently working at the Lake Oswego store and explained the short supply:  “Most of the bikes and parts are sourced from China and surrounding areas, so all of their manufacturing closed for 8 to 10 weeks.

“Besides bikes, things like kids’ bike tires and inner tubes have been difficult to keep in stock. Our venders have none to sell us. But there are plenty of adult bike tires, many of which we had in stock before the current situation.”

Erik Tonkin, owner of Sellwood Cycle Repair at 7953 S.E. 13th Avenue, affirms that the pandemic has created a lot of interest in bicycling. “It was very quiet for a while in March, but soon everyone realized that bicycling is something we can do during COVID-19, and still follow its protocol rules out of concern for our community. It is so nice to see individuals and families with children biking all week long in the neighborhoods. It’s like there's no more weekend; every day is the same!”

Asked if his shop has also had a problem with supply because demand is so great right now, he replies that indeed it has been difficult to obtain new bikes since April, and at times even difficult to get repair parts. But, with 16 employees and a good pre-pandemic supply of parts, the shop has been able to meet the greater demand for repairs. 

“The DNA of our business, ever since its inception, is repair service, so we were tooled-up to handle the increased demand for bike repairs. We’ve had a very high number of people at our doors. Every day is like the busiest day of the year,” he tells THE BEE.

When the business opened in 1991, it offered repair work only. After a few years it started selling used bikes by consignment. Tonkin joined the business part-time then, and was full-time by 1998, and now he owns it. In 2005 the shop also started selling new bikes. “It's been interesting. This year people come in wanting to buy new bikes, but often end up putting money into their old bikes instead. They breathe life into their old bikes because we don't have enough bikes to sell!”

Tonkin, a Woodstock resident and former professional bike racer, who is in the bike business for the long haul, remarks, “I love this business and feel it matters. I’ve done this my entire adult life, ever since leaving Lewis & Clark College. I’m so grateful to have worked in Sellwood for over two decades – to see kids grow up, and families evolve and change. And, all the while, on their bikes!”

Regarding the post-pandemic future of bicycling and the bike business, Tonkin replies, “We’ll see next year if there is the same demand. A lot of people who weren’t able to buy a new bike this year during the pandemic might want one next year. And, some percentage of our new customers will continue to cycle for the convenience, pleasure and health benefits.”



Steve Odell, proprietor of the new “Enthea Tea House” in the Brooklyn neighborhood, stands in front of some of the 150 varieties of Chinese farm-direct teas he has brought back from his annual visits to China.
Steve Odell, proprietor of the new “Enthea Tea House” in the Brooklyn neighborhood, stands in front of some of the 150 varieties of Chinese farm-direct teas he has brought back from his annual visits to China. (Photo by Rita A. Leonard)

Chinese-American tea house opens in Brooklyn

By RITA A. LEONARD
For THE BEE

A unique Chinese-American tea emporium, “Enthea Tea House”, has opened for business in the Brooklyn neighborhood at 3533 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue.

Owner Steve Odell tells THE BEE that has been selling tea and tea-ware from China for the last six years under the name “Rabbits Moon Tea”, but the new storefront is his first “brick and mortar” site.

“My intent is to introduce Pacific Northwest neighbors to the historic tea culture of the Orient,” he explains.

“Enthea” is a name created from Latin words that mean “goddess” and “inner illumination”, he says. The 120-year old Victorian house in which he has opened his tea house has an oriental tea arch, two rooms on the main floor, a business suite upstairs for private events, and a back yard patio and tea garden. Customers remove their street shoes upon entering, and from that point become immersed in the traditions of a Chinese tea house.

Odell travels to China every spring, and has built family-style relations with the farmers there. He offers 150 varieties of farm-direct handmade teas, and hopes to present a non-alcoholic oriental tea culture experience to Pacific Northwest residents.

This new shop also displays artisan handmade tea ware from China, as well as pottery tea items and tea strainers created by Northwest artists. The tea house features antiques and oriental furnishings, and music from vinyl records to immerse clients in the calming sense of a Chinese tea house. You can also purchase ounces of tea from Odell's unusually wide and varied stock.

He points out that the new tea house offers a quiet, non-alcoholic meeting space for tea drinkers and their friends – and he is hoping that clients find “illumination within tea” as they immerse themselves in his special atmosphere.

Enthea Tea House is open Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Sundays from noon until 8 p.m., and on Fridays and Saturdays from noon until 10 p.m., but it’s closed Mondays and Tuesdays. Call 1-831/239-7900 – or check the website http://www.RabbitsMoonTea.com – for more information.



With what appeared to be smoldering tires removed from the building, a PF&R investigator spoke with officials from the Brooklyn-based Columbia Empire Meat Company.
With what appeared to be smoldering tires removed from the building, a PF&R investigator spoke with officials from the Brooklyn-based Columbia Empire Meat Company. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Two-alarms called at fire in Brooklyn meat packing company

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

A fire started around dawn on Tuesday morning, August 25, in Brooklyn-based Columbia Empire Meat Company at 3820 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue. Portland Fire & Rescue (PF&R) crews were dispatched at 6:25 a.m.

Those arriving first to the scene reported back to dispatchers seeing dense black smoke coming from the building – caused by a fire later reported to have been ignited by a fault in a compressor

A PF&R official initially reported, “This has been escalated to a second-alarm commercial fire.” But the fire apparently was not spreading rapidly, in a building in which a much larger fire occurred several years ago – because, by 7:40 a.m., firefighters were reported to be in the “mop up” phase.

Fire officials told reporters at the scene that the flames had originated at equipment on the building’s mezzanine.

Although employees were already at work in the business when the fire broke out, all were safely evacuated, and there were no reports of injuries.



The following morning, there was still broken glass on the front counter of Amy Collins’ temporarily boarded up cookie-making cart, “We Are Baked”, from when several Cartlandia food carts were broken into by thieves.
The following morning, there was still broken glass on the front counter of Amy Collins’ temporarily boarded up cookie-making cart, “We Are Baked”, from when several Cartlandia food carts were broken into by thieves. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Cartlandia’ food carts burglarized on SE 82nd

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

When midnight thieves smashed open the small shops at “Cartlandia”, along S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses, in the wee hours of August 25, they left several food cart owner-operators with devastating losses.

One of those was Amy Collins, the proprietor of cookie cart “We Are Baked”.

“People from the Portland Police Bureau Forensic Division team came out and dusted for prints, and told me it’s likely the perpetrator or perpetrators were wearing gloves, and also apparently did not leave any DNA behind,” Collins told THE BEE.

“It cost me far more than the few dollars they stole – it left my place vandalized inside, with our front window smashed out, so I’ll have to rebuild the whole front of my cart,” Collins reflected.

She explained she’s been in business for about a year, and moved to Cartlandia in February just as the COVID-19 coronavirus concerns began.

“I’ll find a way to, as they say, ‘make lemonade out of life’s lemons’ and come out on top – because I must,” vowed Collins. “This is how I feed my family and pay my bills! So, I’m going to have to rebuild, and do better.”

No food taken
Cartlandia owner Roger Goldengay was surveying the damage on his lot that morning. “We had nine carts damaged by a person or persons who broke into them, looking to steal things,” he said. “This was not done by a poor, hungry person seeking food; whoever it was didn’t take any food. They were looking for spare change, computers, tablets, anything of value that they could sell.

“Hopefully, we’ll catch these criminals; we do have video cameras all over, and we are doing an investigation with the help of the Portland Police,” remarked Goldengay.

Loses day sanitizing kitchen
Working to replace parts on his broken door, Eddie Manjarres of “La Wawa” said that when the thieves got in, they found little of value in the cart, so virtually nothing was taken.

“But still, this damage really hurts us; instead of being open, serving customers and earning money for our family today, we’re having to completely clean the inside of our cart from top to bottom, because we don’t know what filth he may have left behind,” Manjarres explained.

However, the “Cartlandia” food cart complex remains open, offering variety of food, and serving hungry customers. “Cartlandia” is at 8145 S.E. 82nd Avenue, where the Springwater Trail crosses 82nd. Find out more online – http://www.cartlandia.com



These puppet parts are destined to become entertaining performers for you, once kids or adults finish them at home, from kits offered online by Sellwood’s Portland Puppet Museum.
These puppet parts are destined to become entertaining performers for you, once kids or adults finish them at home, from kits offered online by Sellwood’s Portland Puppet Museum. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Sellwood museum goes online to offer puppet-making kits

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Their displays are ready, including an exclusive second-story exhibition space for unique doll houses, but it looks as of Sellwood’s Portland Puppet Museum won’t be opening to the public in person anytime soon.

That’s what partner Steve Overton told THE BEE in late summer. “We can’t open until ‘Phase 2’ is declared by Multnomah County.

“Because of this we’ve been changing the windows out every couple of days or so, with puppets from the museum,” Overton said. “When people walk by, they see different characters in the window. It’s so fun because neighbors are bringing their family over to see what’s changed.”

While they wait to open their in-person exhibit to visitors – it will feature world-famous puppet makers – he said they’ve been busy putting together new puppet-making kits for kids and adults to enjoy.

“We cannot do in-person workshops, as we typically offer during the summer, so we are developing at-home puppet kits – complete with heads and body parts, costume material, jewels, and all the things needed to operate either a marionette, or rod puppet,” Overton explained.

The teaching of how to do it is done online, with step-by-step videos, illustrating just how to put the puppet together and perform with it.

UPDATE:  The Portland Puppet Museum reopened on October 1 with its new “Puppets of Portland” exhibit. From Thursday to Sunday from 2 - 8 p.m., guests can once again enjoy the Portland Puppet Museum, with admission by donation. Masks, hand sanitizing, and social distancing are required for admission; and, they ask you reference the hand-painted "Panda Paw Prints", spaced 6 feet apart, while there. Don’t have a mask? They’ll give you a new one upon entering.

If you’re interested in finding out more, go to – http://www.puppetmuseum.com






BUSINESS BRIEFS


Sellwood Medical Clinic is all ready for you to drive through their parking lot for your flu shot – but do call to make an appointment first.
Sellwood Medical Clinic is all ready for you to drive through their parking lot for your flu shot – but do call to make an appointment first.

Sellwood Medical Clinic offers “drive through” flu shot: This year, getting a flu shot is described as more important than ever in this era of the coronavirus pandemic – and Sellwood Medical Clinic has devised a new, easier-than-ever way to get one, while maintaining social distancing. Just call for an appointment time, then get in your car and be in their back parking lot on the northeast corner of S.E. 13th at Sherrett Street at the appointed time. Wear a T-shirt or loose sleeved shirt so they can administer the shot in your left arm, pay for it or use your insurance, and you’re done. You can even bring others along for their shot too, but they ask that you make appointments for everyone you are bringing along. The number to call for an appointment is 503/595-9300, option 3.

“Killer Burger” franchise to expand outside Oregon: “Killer Burger”, at S.E. 17th and Linn in Sellwood, is one of ten Killer Burger locations in the greater Portland area; now the Portland-based chain announces it plans to expand throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond, quadrupling its franchise presence in the next five years. T.J. Southard, CEO and founder of Killer Burger, says, “When it comes to an experience where burgers, craft beers, and music come together, there is no other concept that brings the energy like we do.” Southard says he developed Killer Burger to open a restaurant where he and his close friends could “hang out, blast rock music, enjoy dinner-style burgers, and drink craft beers”. The current hours for takeout and delivery at the Sellwood location are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. seven days a week.

“Branches” card and gift shop closes: At the end of August, the Branches “uncommon cards and curious finds” gift shop, at 6656 S.E. Milwaukie Avenue in Westmoreland, announced on its website that the store would be closing permanently. “We had a good run, but due to COVID-19, it’s time to say our goodbyes. We have loved being a part of this community, and we thank you so much for your support.” A closing sale started September 1, with everything 30% off and all sales final – both in the store and online, at http://www.branchespdx.com – but no final closing date was announced at that time.

Veteran brand and marketing consultant Robert Shepard is the presenter at the Assn. of Home Businesses online ZOOM meeting, open to all, on October 15, starting at 6:30 p.m.; RSVP to attend.
Veteran brand and marketing consultant Robert Shepard is the presenter at the Assn. of Home Businesses online ZOOM meeting, open to all, on October 15, starting at 6:30 p.m.; RSVP to attend.

AHB meeting shares “building your brand, to build your business”: Veteran Brand and Marketing Strategist Robert Shepard is this month’s speaker at the ZOOM meeting of Sellwood’s Assn. of Home Businesses. Robert explains how a combination of excellent creative and well-informed strategy may be your best approach to brand-building – a conversation that will be timely and useful to any freelancer, contractor, and home-based or small business owner. Everyone welcome! Learn from and enjoy this conversation, along with the usual camaraderie, at the Thursday, October 15th, meeting of the AHB – online at 6:30 p.m. If you’d like to join this online meeting, please email your request to – eric@ericnorberg.com. (Or call 503/232-2326.) Folks who RSVP will be sent a ZOOM link and password prior to the event. No charge for attending; but without your RSVP you cannot obtain the link to join the meeting. (Click the photo at right to visit the AHB website.)

“You Were Here” art exhibit features long-gone Portland icons: PushDot Gallery in the Ford Building on S.E. Division, just north of the Brooklyn neighborhood, is presenting the Lyn Nance-Sasser and Stephen Sasser exhibit of a series of prints entitled, “You are Here – Portland”. They’ve been displaying in the area since 2012, and have decided this is the final time they will be doing so. The show consists of images of people, places, and things that are no longer in our city. The duo has assembled a collection of 30+ new prints, combined with a large-scale, wallpaper-sized, 1956 service station tourist map of the City of Portland. The exhibit is open now, and runs through October 30, at the PushDot Gallery, in The Ford Building, 2505 S.E. 11th Avenue, #104.

“Green Oasis” opens separate Sellwood wine and beer bar: The Green Oasis dispensary announces it has opened an adjacent, but separately-situated, wine and beer bar – which is also separately licensed by the OLCC. The new bar – which the owners say is a separate business entirely from the adjacent dispensary – had its Grand Opening on Saturday, September 12, and featured a fundraising raffle, with proceeds directed to American Legion Post 180. The address of the new bar is 1035 S.E. Tacoma Street in Sellwood, open seven days a week from 10 to 10 – except Sundays, when it is open 11 to 9.



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