Eric Norberg, Editor & Gen. Manager
Brian Monihan, Publisher
Sandy Hubbard, Independent BEE
     Advertising Representative
Cheryl Duval, Supervisor of Ad Design
Molly Filler, Page Design
Jerrin Sipe, Accounting

Eric Norberg:           Sandy Hubbard:
503 / 232-2326          971 / 407-7942
 fax: 503/232-9787


"Community Classifieds" want ads: 503/620-7355
Circulation/subscriptions: 503/620-9797
Accounting/Billing: 971/204-7712
Composition: 971/204-7836
Community Newspapers, Inc.

Editorial and Sales Address:
1837 S.E. Harold St, Portland, OR 97202-4932
Remit bill payments to:
Accounts Receivable Department
P.O. Box 22109, Portland, OR 97269-2109

e-mail:
ReadTheBee@myexcel.com


THE BEE IS LOCALLY OWNED BY THE PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP

September, 2021 -- Vol. 116, No. 1
Scroll down to read this issue!

Memories of THE BEE's first 100 years!
In 2006, THE BEE celebrated its centennial of serving Southeast Portland!  A special four-page retrospective of Inner Southeast Portland's century, written by Eileen Fitzsimons, and drawn from the pages of THE BEE over the previous 100 years, appeared in our September, 2006, issue.
Click here to read the special centenary retrospective!


_________________________________________
BEE SUBMISSION AND AD DEADLINES

Next BEE is our October
issue, with a deadline of September 16.
(The November issue has an ad and copy deadline of October 14.)

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING? CLICK HERE FOR RATES AND INFORMATION!
     ____________________________________

Want to subscribe to receive the PRINT version of THE BEE in the mail?
E-mail circulation@CommNewspapers.com -- or telephone 503/620-9797, during weekday business hours.
The 12-issue annual subscription rate is $19 per year for addresses located in Multnomah County, Oregon; and $29 for anywhere else in the U.S.(it's based on the differential postage rates for our class of postage). For international rates, inquire via the e-mail address or telephone number just above!

 _________________________________________________________________________


Daily news! 
The Portland Tribune is updated a number of times every day, to bring you the latest news of the Portland area and Oregon.  Click on the banner at left to read the Tribune online!

THE BEE has a second website -- searchable for past stories.  The content for the current month includes what is on this one, presented in a different format.  To visit our newer website, click the banner at right!

GDPR NOTICE: The owner of this website, www.ReadTheBee.com, collects no information on this site from any reader, and never has.



Health Advisory issued for Ross Island Lagoon, and Holgate Channel of the Willamette River

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a temporary recreational use health advisory on the afternoon of Tuesday, August 31, for Ross Island Lagoon and the Holgate Channel in the Willamette River in Portland -- due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom, and cyanotoxin levels above recreational values for human exposure.

OHA says people should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the river where the blooms are, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin -- but if you have skin sensitivities you may get a puffy red rash.

You are still encouraged to visit the Ross Island Lagoon and Holgate Channel in the Willamette River and enjoy activities such as fishing, walking, biking, canoeing, kayaking, and bird watching, while taking proper precautions. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water
Drinking water directly from areas of the river affected by a bloom is especially dangerous -- toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering, or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact the health department with questions about water available at nearby areas


Children and pets
Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill, and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins, by drinking the water, licking their fur, or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Be aware that dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms
Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness, and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention. Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite, and more. If your dog exhibits symptoms veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing
Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks. Fat, skin, and organs should be removed before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971/673-0482.



Those on both sides of the issue stayed on opposite sides of this Eastmoreland street – with occasional verbal skirmishes spilling out onto the pavement. Traffic – including TriMet buses, residents, and alleged agitators holding various views – were allowed to pass unimpeded.
Those on both sides of the issue stayed on opposite sides of this Eastmoreland street – with occasional verbal skirmishes spilling out onto the pavement. Traffic – including TriMet buses, residents, and alleged agitators holding various views – were allowed to pass unimpeded. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
This group assembled in Eastmoreland in protest of the policies of Multnomah County Chair Debora Kafoury, whom they believed lived nearby.
This group assembled in Eastmoreland in protest of the policies of Multnomah County Chair Debora Kafoury, whom they believed lived nearby. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Anti-mask, anti-vax’ protest in Eastmoreland

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Several Eastmoreland neighbors who live along S.E. 32nd Avenue were surprised and bemused when a protest formed about 6 p.m., in the front of a home – reported to be the residence of Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury – on Friday evening, August 13.

Some 50 people were gathered in the area, on both sides of the street. At first, it was difficult to tell who the protesters were, and who held opposing views – other than through sporadic verbal exchanges – until a female protester used an amplified bullhorn to make clear her own views.

One of the protesters, Amanda Fisk, said she showed up after receiving an e-mail about the planned protest, and she agreed to speak with THE BEE. “I’m out here to protest the mask mandates, and the ordinance that [Chair Deborah Kafoury] passed that permits homeless people to camp beyond 10 feet of a person’s home,” she began.

When we asked why the topic on the poster she was carrying differed from her statement, she replied, “What we’re all protesting, collectively, is us entering into a fascist state; our country is under siege. This includes demanding vaccinations, masking, social distancing. I don’t believe that the virus is spread by asymptomatic people.”

None of the neighbors who live on the block wanted to be quoted in THE BEE; but generally they agreed that this occurrence was unique and unexpected, and none said they felt endangered by the protestors.

Across the street from the protesters, a man engaged in exchanges with some of the demonstrators. When we inquired if he was a neighbor, he said his name was Damien Shows and that he actually lived in Woodstock – eight blocks east of the protest.

“I do not like this being here, in a neighborhood where families with kids live,” Shows said. “Especially because it has attracted the ‘Proud Boys’ and ‘Patriot Prayer’ groups, who promoted this event online – I’ve been seeing them here this evening, in the area. These people are anti-science, anti-mask, and anti-vaccine – abhorrent, in so many ways.”

Although rumors flew that the protesters planned to set up a campground and spend the night on the parking strips nearby, most of the group had cleared out by 8:30 p.m. No injuries or property damage were reported and, as best we could determine, Chair Kafoury did not appear, and wasn’t impacted by the disturbance that night.



The front room of this Brentwood-Darlington home was charred when a fire ripped through the house, killing its occupant and her two dogs.
The front room of this Brentwood-Darlington home was charred when a fire ripped through the house, killing its occupant and her two dogs. (Courtesy of PF&R)

Woman, dogs, killed in Brentwood-Darlington fire

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

An intense fire raging inside a Brentwood-Darlington home took the life of its occupant and her two dogs on Wednesday evening, August 11.

A neighbor said she was walking her dog, turning from Ogden onto to Rural Street – the road just south of the house. “The smoke coming from the house [on S.E. Bybee Boulevard] was so thick and intense, I was choking,” she told THE BEE.

Portland Fire & Rescue crews were dispatched to the scene moments later – at 8:41 p.m. that evening. Woodstock Fire Station 25’s Engine Company pulled up in front of the house, and confirmed to dispatchers heavy smoke erupting from the structure.

As the firefighters pulled out water lines to begin to battle the flames, the crew of Ladder Truck 25 pulled up and cautiously entered the house, looking for potential victims.

Firefighters reported to dispatch that they were encountering limited visibility and high heat as they began to extinguish the fire, said to be centered in the front room. Before long they reported finding a person inside the house, and radioed that they were bringing her to the front door.

“Crews did bring a victim out of the structure, but they determined that she had succumbed to her injuries,” said PF&R Public Information Officer Terry Foster.

“The victim was an adult female, approximately 50 to 60 years old,” he reported, adding that firefighters also located two deceased dogs in the home. Fire investigators responded, but have not yet publicly announced the cause of the fatal fire.

“We encourage all residents to make sure they have working smoke detectors and to be prepared in case of a fire; both by having an escape plan in place, as well as calling 911 immediately,” Foster reminded.



A participant in the 2021 Providence Bridge Pedal waved to THE BEE, as she headed west on the Sellwood Bridge.
A participant in the 2021 Providence Bridge Pedal waved to THE BEE, as she headed west on the Sellwood Bridge. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

‘Bridge Pedal’ returns; thousands of riders bike the Sellwood Bridge

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Setting out on the annual bicycle ride as early as 7:30 a.m. on Sunday, August 8, hearty participants in the 2021 “Providence Bridge Pedal” looked very cheerful as they again took to Portland’s streets and bridges. The event had been cancelled in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Participants from the two routes which included the Sellwood Bridge had gotten onto the Springwater Corridor Trail north of the Ross Island Bridge, and from there headed south to S.E. Spokane Street, where they jogged a block east, and then south onto the short stub of S.E. Grand Avenue – where many stopped to rest, grab a snack, or make use of free bicycle repairs offered nearby.

From there, riders headed across the Sellwood Bridge, both on the wide sidewalk, and a coned-off lane along with vehicle traffic.

“This is really great, but I must admit I should have trained more before taking on the [23 mile] ‘Fremont Express’ route this year!” remarked Brooklyn neighbor Sade Stuart, as she paused to gaze at the Willamette River from one of the belvederes built into the edge of the new Sellwood Bridge. “And, I might look into getting a motor-assisted bike for long rides!” she added ruefully.

After powering up the incline to the apex of the Sellwood Bridge, others also paused to admire the view and take a break, including those who’d opted for the other official route that included this bridge – the 20-mile “Main Ride”.

“Overall it was a very good day; we were extremely lucky with the weather,” the Providence Bridge Pedal Event Director, Rick Bauman, told THE BEE a few days later.

“I think the best thing that came out of the event this year was that it actually happened; this was the first major participatory event in Portland since September of 2019,” Bauman pointed out. “Even with the hurdles of substantial COVID-19 precautions, and major reconstruction on Naito Parkway, we got through without any major problems.”

Just how many riders pedaled their way across the Sellwood Bridge? “We estimate about 4,000 cyclists crossed that bridge last Sunday,” he said.

Now, enjoy a few quick highlights of the ride over the new bridge in this BEE video:

______________________________________________________________________
Neighbors packed the Duniway Elementary School library in March of 2017 to learn the outcome of a neighborhood survey about the Eastmoreland Historic District proposal – but both sides of the issue felt that the close result confirmed their own position, so the outcome appeared inconclusive at the time.
Neighbors packed the Duniway Elementary School library in March of 2017 to learn the outcome of a neighborhood survey about the Eastmoreland Historic District proposal – but both sides of the issue felt that the close result confirmed their own position, so the outcome appeared inconclusive at the time. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Eastmoreland Historic District issue again ramping up

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

For those new to the matter, a number of residents in portions of the Eastmoreland neighborhood, supported by the Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association (ENA), have been trying since 2012 to create a State of Oregon, and federally-recognized, “Historic District” there – which led up to interviewing Historic “consultant” candidates in March of 2016.

As the Historic District application continued, proponents and opponents became more vocal. Two main groups, “Keep Eastmoreland Free” (opposed) and “I Heart Eastmoreland” (in favor) created websites and separate campaigns to further promote their sides of the issue.

THE BEE has continued to detail the twists and turns of this nomination over the years, including when the application was twice rejected on technical grounds – mainly concerning how “legitimate property owners” were to be defined.

In 2018, Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission’s “State Historic Preservation Office” (SHPO) began work to clarify the rules to implement the Federal National Register of Historic Places program, administered by the United States National Park Service. A SHPO Commission amended and adopted state rules at its regular June 23 meeting this year, allowing the process again to go forward.

Eastmoreland Historic District proposal “still active”
To get a better understanding of these amended rules, THE BEE recently again contacted Oregon State Parks Associate Director Chris Havel and Associate Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer Ian Johnson. One question we had was whether the Eastmoreland Historic District proposal had expired, or “timed out”, because it has been in the works for longer than two years.

Chris Havel responded, “The newly-adopted state rule sets out two processes for long-running projects:

  • One for nomination documents submitted before the rule was filed with the Secretary of State on 6/25/2021; and,
  • Another for those nomination documents submitted before that date which remain “active” – meaning that the proponent did not withdraw the nomination from consideration.

“For those nominations that were withdrawn from consideration or submitted after the effective date of the rule, the SHPO must resubmit the nomination document within two years of the date that the nomination document is returned by the National Park Service,” Havel added.

“This is a provision in the state rule, not a federal rule, or a National Park Service policy or practice. If the SHPO fails to resubmit the ‘nomination document’ to NPS within this timeframe, the process stops, and begins again,” he said, referring us to OAR 736-050-0250(18)(e through f).

Asked to simplify, Havel said, “The Eastmoreland Historic District nomination has NOT expired; the proponent, the Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association, never withdrew the nomination document – so the effort is therefore active under the provisions described in the rule.”

Timeline for proposal consideration unclear
The Oregon SHPO will resubmit the proposed Eastmoreland Historic District nomination document on behalf of the Eastmoreland Neighborhood Association, Havel told us. The SHPO will review the nomination document, property owner list, and notarized statements, for completeness and accuracy – and then make corrections where necessary.

“We will begin by publishing a public notice informing property owners that we are moving forward with the effort. Property owners will be invited to submit notarized statements, and we will edit the property owner list based on a review of county property records and submitted notarized statements,” Havel went on.

He said that, because this nomination document remains active, property owners may submit notarized statements now. “However, owners may want to wait until we create forms that meet the requirements that are described in the rule, to make sure that their statement meets the requirements,” Havel clarified. “We will edit the nomination document as necessary following consultation with NPS to determine what may need to be updated; the process for resubmission is described in detail in OAR 736-050-0250(18).

“Due to budget and staff cutbacks, and the complexity of the new rule, we anticipate that we will begin planning for this project late in August, with the goal of resubmitting it to NPS as soon as possible. “We have not yet scoped the project, but we expect to have a timeline for the process within the next 60 days.”

Proponents and opponents chime in
Speaking for themselves, two Eastmoreland neighbors, with opposing positions on the proposal, commented on it to THE BEE, as well as on the ongoing process. . .

Rod Merrick – in favor of the proposal:  “The EHD nomination has been approved by the Portland Landmarks Commission (PLC), the Statewide Commission on Historic Preservation (SCHP), the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), and the National Park Service (NPS) – with the exception of the final count of owners and objectors.

“Since 2017, the ENA has supported the Historic District to ‘guide change’, and to provide demolition protection for historic resources from speculative demolitions and redevelopment. These include our many historically-significant properties: The Eastmoreland Golf Course (on which the city has proposed building housing), the Crystal Springs Rhododendron Garden, and the invaluable mature street and yard trees that benefit air quality, and offer protection from extreme heat caused by climate change.

“Opponents of the district have used various legal and illegal means, including four households creating 5,000 “objection trusts,” to overrule neighbors in attempts to delay and derail the nomination. This forced the SHPO to revise and clarify rules for the process, especially around the use of trusts to distort the count. Following the update of state rules around these issues in June, we are informed that the SHPO will begin to finalize the count this fall, and will resubmit the nomination to the NPS.” 

Bert Sperling – opposed to the proposal
:
  “I feel that the proposed Historic District application needs to be paused or resubmitted. First, at this moment, we have no firm idea what a Historic District even means. There have been changes in codes at the national, state, and local level. The city’s current historic resource code is not in compliance with the state changes, and new revisions will be going before the City Council on November 3rd. Even the definition of ‘demolition’ has not been finalized.

“Second, so much has changed in the five years since the Eastmoreland application was submitted. Over 22% of Eastmoreland homes have changed hands in that time. [Using a count of current and previous homeowners, based on ownership records provided by the City of Portland, June 2021.] These are hundreds of homeowners who have never had a chance to learn about or provide feedback on the Historic District.

“Finally, stepping back and restarting the application process will give the entire current neighborhood a chance to make the decision together, and leave the contentiousness behind us.”

THE BEE will continue to cover this unique process as it continues to unfold.



After driving wildly through late Sunday afternoon traffic, narrowly missing other cars and pedestrians along the way, a suspected vehicle thief swerved off the road and crashed on S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses at Division Street.
After driving wildly through late Sunday afternoon traffic, narrowly missing other cars and pedestrians along the way, a suspected vehicle thief swerved off the road and crashed on S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses at Division Street. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
After dealing with his parole problems in Clackamas County, this man – known both as “22-year-old Chase R. Head” and “26-year-old William Francis Hicks” – will then be facing 11 Felony and eight Misdemeanor charges in Multnomah County.
After dealing with his parole problems in Clackamas County, this man – known both as “22-year-old Chase R. Head” and “26-year-old William Francis Hicks” – will then be facing 11 Felony and eight Misdemeanor charges in Multnomah County. (MCDC booking photo)

Felon charged with stealing four vehicles – all at once!

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Due to legal rules in Oregon, it has often been difficult for law enforcement officers to charge a suspect with vehicle theft – so stealing cars and trucks has been an everyday occurrence, especially here in Inner Southeast Portland.

On Sunday afternoon, August 1, East Precinct officers were alerted at 5:39 p.m. to be on the lookout for a stolen light-bronze-colored Ford F250 “King Cab” pickup truck, with a “toy hauler” trailer attached.

“A responding officer broadcast the description of the truck, trailer, and cargo – which was somewhat unique,” reported Portland Police spokesperson Lt. Greg Pashley.

“The truck and trailer had been in a parking lot at Eastport Plaza, while the owner conducted personal business at one or more retail outlets,” Lt. Pashley went on. “There is nothing in the reports indicating that the vehicle was running, or that the keys had been left in it.

“Other officers on patrol that afternoon saw it near N.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses and Glisan Street; however, when he was signaled to pull over, the driver failed to stop.”

Taking off southbound on the Avenue of Roses, the driver attempted to turn east on S.E. Division Street; but, going too fast, the accused thief lost control. The truck and trailer swerved, then jumped the curb on Division, before knocking a newly-installed steel traffic signal utility box off its pedestal. The truck and what it was towing careened across the sidewalk – which fortunately was clear of pedestrians – and mowed down a row of bushes before coming to a stop in the “Super Market” convenience store’s parking lot.

“The suspect fled, but officers captured him a short distance from where he left the truck and trailer,” Pashley reported.

The suspect, who later identified himself to officers as 22-year-old “Chase R. Head”, ran west, crossing S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses while dodging traffic – but he was captured in the parking lot of a quick-lube store. He was treated at the scene by Portland Fire & Rescue’s Engine 19 paramedic/firefighters – then he was first taken to a local hospital to be evaluated, and then was booked into jail.

“Officers recovered a firearm from inside the truck that did not belong to the truck owner,” Pashley added drily.

The accused thief, “Mr. Head”, racked up an impressive list of Felony and Misdemeanor charges as he was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) at 12:58 a.m. on August 2:

  • Resisting Arrest,
  • Reckless Driving,
  • Criminal Mischief I,
  • Interfering with a Police Officer,
  • Attempt to Elude (on foot),
  • Attempt to Elude (in vehicle),
  • Four counts of Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver (property damage),
  • Four counts of Unauthorized Use of a Vehicle,
  • Felon In Possession of a Firearm, and,
  • Four counts of Possession of a Stolen Vehicle.

When we were unable to find the suspect’s name – “Chase R. Head” – in our search of the MCDC records, we turned to Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office Public Information Officer Chris Liedle for help.

“The suspect, who the PPB had identified as ‘Chase Head’, was booked under a different name: 26-year-old William Francis Hicks; when he was entered in the system. His fingerprints were later matched to his primary booking name, which is ‘Chase Head’.

“A ‘primary booking name’ is the name that is provided at the first booking in the State of Oregon,” Liedle explained. “Hicks is considered a secondary booking name, kind of like an alias, in laymen’s terms.

“At the pre-trial release interview, Multnomah County Court staff learned there was a ‘Parole Hold’ outstanding for Mr. Head/Hicks, out of Clackamas County,” Liedle revealed.

On August 4, Mr. Head/Hicks was transferred to the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office; at some point, he’ll be returned to Multnomah County to face this long list of criminal charges.

As for how this man could be charged with simultaneously stealing four different vehicles at the very same time – Head/Hicks is accused of stealing the pickup truck, a four-wheeler ATV in the truck bed, the “toy hauler” trailer, and the vehicle inside of that.  

It will be interesting to see if a judge now decides to waive some of the charges in this “stolen, stolen, stolen, stolen vehicle” case – a case in which other drivers and pedestrians could have been seriously injured by the suspect’s reckless driving – or even shot by the suspect, who was illegally packing a gun.



Jay Mellies and Ellen Damaschino pose outside their Eastmoreland home with the two Portland Pickles baseball players they hosted this season, Jacob Jablonski and Justin DeCriscio.
Jay Mellies and Ellen Damaschino pose outside their Eastmoreland home with the two Portland Pickles baseball players they hosted this season, Jacob Jablonski and Justin DeCriscio. (Photo by Paige Wallace)

Eastmoreland couple enjoys hosting ‘Portland Pickles’ players

By PAIGE WALLACE
For THE BEE

As summer shadows lengthen across the pitcher’s mound, energetic baseball fans gather in the stands of Southeast Portland’s Walker Field, at S.E. 92nd and Holgate Boulevard, to root for the home team. Among them is an Eastmoreland couple who opened their home to two Portland Pickles players this season – and found that the experience knocked their summer out of the park!

“It’s been a very, very positive experience,” smiled Ellen Damaschino. She, and her husband Jay Mellies, have been hosting individual Pickles players since 2018. This summer, for the first time, they welcomed two players into their home at the same time: Shortstops Jacob Jablonski and Justin DeCriscio, both from California.

Mellies is a microbiologist and professor at Reed College; Damaschino describes herself as a “recovering pastry chef” now working for a nonprofit. Their decision to become Pickles hosts stemmed from a lifetime love of baseball, and a more recent commitment to seeking out new adventures.

After becoming empty-nesters, the couple decided to incorporate something new into their lives. “We had gone to several of the Portland Pickles games in the past years, and we really enjoy baseball,” Damaschino explained, about their initial decision to sign up. “Our daughters have moved out permanently. We have an extra room. Let's do this!” The couple has hosted players each summer since then, except when the team went on hiatus during the pandemic last year.

Pickles games take place at Walker Stadium in Lents Park, just south of Holgate Boulevard. The team consists of college-level players who spend the summer in Portland honing their skills, during what would normally be their off season. They compete in the West Coast League, which encompasses teams from around Oregon, Washington, and southwestern Canada.

Portland area residents interested in hosting Pickles players can apply to do so at the team’s website – http:www.portlandpicklesbaseball.com; each host family may house up to four players – usually beginning at the end of May, and lasting until the season ends in mid-August. This year saw 21 host families volunteering across the Portland area; but Damaschino said the team is always looking for more. The Portland Pickles’ website specifically asks for host families in areas close to the stadium.

Teammates actually spend most of their time with each other – rather than with their host families – simply because they carry a full schedule of gym workouts, practices, and games. But on Mondays, which is the players’ only day off each week, their hosts get to show off what it’s like to live in the Portland area.

Many Pickles players hail from towns around the West, so this is often their first time visiting Oregon. Mellies and Damaschino asked Jablonski and DeCriscio what they wanted to do during their stay, and the results were a tour of Columbia River Gorge waterfalls, a jet boat excursion on the Willamette River, and a visit to the dinosaur exhibit at OMSI.

Jablonski also raved about an afternoon spent canoeing with Mellies. The two launched from Sellwood Park and paddled downriver to the Tilikum Crossing transit bridge. Jablonski said he has also enjoyed exploring the Eastmoreland neighborhood with his drone camera, and on rental scooters.

DeCriscio agreed that Inner Southeast Portland has been a great place to land. “It’s a nice part of the town, and I pretty much love everything about it,” he said. He also complimented his hosts for providing him with something he’s never experienced before: A home away from home. Since he’s starting college this fall, and has never lived away from his own family for this long, that warm welcome has felt very comforting. “They’ve made the transition really nice!”

Pickles’ host families are not compensated financially, but they do receive complimentary season tickets, which may provide unexpected benefits. “Walker Stadium is a wonderful place to see a game,” Mellies remarked, “But then you have the added ‘connection’ of a player you’re hosting, on the field and who you can cheer for. It just makes it that much more special.”

“Also, let's not forget section 208, which is the ‘host family’ section,” Damaschino chimed in. “We're all tight! So a big draw is that second community, not only for the players but for the host families. It’s a blast!”

Hosting has led to long-term connections with players. The couple sometimes travels to college games to see them play, or they’ll all meet up when the young men come back through town. One player even makes a point to text Damaschino every year on her birthday.

“It’s really nice to be a mentor, because these kids open up to you about a lot of stuff,” Damaschino said of her hosting experiences. “We’re not their parents, so there’s just like ‘a safe zone’, I think, in a lot of ways. And I think it’s nice to have a relationship with young adults who are not your children.”

Mellies agreed: “Yeah, it’s a real privilege to be able to spend time with them, and to listen to their hopes and dreams, and what they want to do in their lives.” The couple already plans to host again in 2022.

Meantime, Jablonski said his connection with Damaschino and Mellies will extend far beyond this summer. “They’re like mom and dad away from home and, you know, they’ll probably always be that way.”



Investigators found – and carefully marked – substantial evidence of shots having been fired near S.E. 74th and Woodstock Boulevard.
Investigators found – and carefully marked – substantial evidence of shots having been fired near S.E. 74th and Woodstock Boulevard. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
After being charged with one Felony and four Misdemeanors, 18-year-old Tavon M. Wilson was released from custody.
After being charged with one Felony and four Misdemeanors, 18-year-old Tavon M. Wilson was released from custody. (MCDC booking photo)

Woodstock Boulevard shooting leaves one wounded

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

Gunshots heard at about 1 a.m. on Tuesday morning, July 27, brought East Precinct officers to S.E. Woodstock Boulevard near 74th Avenue.

When officers found a car in the area they believed may have been involved in the shooting, and attempted to stop it, the driver took off.

After a brief 1.4 mile pursuit, the vehicle came to a stop near S.E. 100th Avenue and Henry Street. Four people ran from the car as soon as it stopped. Two of the suspects were taken into custody by officers; and, the other two fled into the neighborhood and officers did not find them.

Officers soon realized that one those from the car that they’d taken into custody had been shot in the original incident, and called for an ambulance; the wounded person was sent to a local hospital by ambulance, with a non-life-threatening wound.

After searching the area near where the car stopped, officers recovered a firearm.

Back at the original crime scene, officers found 24 spent bullet cartridge casings, and learned that at least one vehicle that had been struck by gunfire. The PPB Enhanced Community Safety Team responded to assist in the investigation.

The other suspect taken into custody was identified as 18-year-old Tavon M. Wilson. That morning, 3:36 a.m., Wilson was booked into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) on charges of “Attempt to Elude (Vehicle)”, Reckless Driving, and three counts of Recklessly Endangering Another Person.

After his arraignment, Wilson was released by a judge from custody later the same day. Release Reason: Pretrial Supervision.

This is an ongoing investigation; PPB officials say. They ask anyone with information about this case, to e-mail – crimetips@portlandoregon.gov – and reference Case No. 21-205553.



Comments? News tips? Click here to submit!

Trying to remember or locate a BEE advertiser? Click here to e-mail us, and we'll help!

Fair warning:  We have so many great photos on page 2 this month, it may take a while to load on slower connections!  If that applies to you, click the link below, then go get refreshment, come back, relax, and prepare to enjoy what we have for you on page 2!

READY TO TURN TO PAGE 2 -- FOR "MORE NEWS"? Click here!

Note to readers: At some point, this, our original Internet website, will be replaced at this web address by our new website, as part of the Community Newspapers group. At that time, you will still be able to access this long-established and smartphone-friendly website, if you save this address:  www.readthebee.mobi. You'll still have your choice of which one to visit!

Entire contents © 2021, THE BEE
; all rights reserved.




HTML Hit Counters
Hit Counters