Eric Norberg, Editor & Gen. Manager
Brian Monihan, Publisher
Sandy Hubbard, Independent BEE
     Advertising Representative
Molly Filler, Page Design
Jaime McCaslin, Accounting

Eric Norberg:            Sandy Hubbard:
503 / 232-2326          971 / 407-7942
 fax: 503/232-9787


"Community Classifieds" want ads: 503/620-7355
Circulation/subscriptions: 503/620-9797
Accounting/Billing: 971/204-7712
Community Newspapers, Inc.

Editorial and Sales Address:
1837 S.E. Harold St, Portland, OR 97202-4932
Remit bill payments to:
Accounts Receivable Department
P.O. Box 22109, Portland, OR 97269-2109

e-mail:
ReadTheBee@myexcel.com


THE BEE IS LOCALLY OWNED BY THE PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP

July, 2022 - Vol. 116, No. 11
Scroll down to read this issue!

Memories of THE BEE's first 100 years!
In 2006, THE BEE celebrated its centennial of serving Southeast Portland!  A special four-page retrospective of Inner Southeast Portland's century, written by Eileen Fitzsimons, and drawn from the pages of THE BEE over the previous 100 years, appeared in our September, 2006, issue.
Click here to read the special centenary retrospective!


_________________________________________
BEE SUBMISSION AND AD DEADLINES

Next BEE is our August
issue, with a deadline of July 21.
(The September issue has an ad and copy deadline of August 18.)

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING? CLICK HERE FOR RATES AND INFORMATION!
     ____________________________________

Want to subscribe to receive the PRINT version of THE BEE in the mail?
E-mail circulation@CommNewspapers.com -- or telephone 503/620-9797, during weekday business hours.
The 12-issue annual subscription rate is $19 per year for addresses located in Multnomah County, Oregon; and $29 for anywhere else in the U.S.(it's based on the differential postage rates for our class of postage). For international rates, inquire via the e-mail address or telephone number just above!

 _________________________________________________________________________


Daily news! 
The Portland Tribune is updated a number of times every day, to bring you the latest news of the Portland area and Oregon.  Click on the banner at left to read the Tribune online!

THE BEE has a second website -- searchable for past stories.  The content for the current month includes what is on this one, presented in a different format.  To visit our newer website, click the banner at right!

GDPR NOTICE: The owner of this website, www.ReadTheBee.com, collects no information on this site from any reader, and never has.



These are students of Lane Middle School shown leaving the building on the last day of school, June 10th. Lane’s student enrollment, 360, is below the 500 that PPS prefers for middle schools. Boundary changes will feed more graduating fifth graders into Lane by the fall of 2023.
These are students of Lane Middle School shown leaving the building on the last day of school, June 10th. Lane’s student enrollment, 360, is below the 500 that PPS prefers for middle schools. Boundary changes will feed more graduating fifth graders into Lane by the fall of 2023. (Photo by Elizabeth Ussher Groff)

Southeast school boundary & enrollment changes

By ELIZABETH USSHER GROFF
For THE BEE

After two long years of studying, meeting, deliberating, and collaborating with parents and community members, Portland Public Schools made a final decision on boundary changes for Southeast Portland schools at its May 24th Board Meeting.

However, the PPS decision was not one that the Southeast Guiding Coalition (SEGC) is happy with. The SEGC is a volunteer group of parents, community members, and school leaders who came together in May of 2021 to collaborate with the PPS Board regarding boundary and enrollment changes. The Board would then eventually recommend changes to create more enrollment balance and equity in some Southeast Portland schools.

One of the SEGC’s concerns is that some Inner Southeast Portland schools were left essentially untouched in the process. Those include Llewellyn, Duniway, Grout, Winterhaven, Abernethy, Buckman, Sunnyside, and Richmond. The Board may deal with these schools at some point, but many of them are overcrowded and in relatively affluent communities in Southeast Portland.  At this point, no changes have been recommended for those schools.

The decision made, says the School Board, is one based on research and recommendations from Portland Public Schools administration. This final decision means that, in the Fall of 2023, Lane Middle School’s boundary will be expanded. Some students that would previously have been sent to Sellwood and Hosford Middle Schools will now be assigned to Lane. The intent is to boost Lane’s enrollment, allowing it to increase the diversity of its electives, increase resources and services to students and families, and provide stability to its funding over time.

As part of this change, any Lewis School graduating fifth graders living east of 52nd Avenue will be assigned to Lane Middle School. However, students living east of 52nd Avenue and who currently already attend Lewis will have the opportunity to either stay at Lewis until its highest-grade level, or to transfer immediately to Whitman Elementary. All students living east of 52nd Avenue just starting elementary school will now be going to Whitman Elementary.

As reported in the March issue of THE BEE, one decision already made earlier in the year was for both the “Mandarin Immersion Program” (DLI) and the “Neighborhood Program” to stay co-located at Woodstock School. This will retain Woodstock’s enrollment of 500 students, and won’t diminish its diversity.

However, the destination middle school will change for Woodstock Elementary students. Neighborhood Program fifth graders will attend Lane Middle School starting in Fall of 2023.  Mandarin Immersion students at Woodstock will instead go to Harrison Park Middle School, which is being converted from a K-8 school into a full middle school. Creston Elementary School will send their graduating fifth graders to Hosford, instead of Kellogg.

Also in the Fall of 2023 the grade structure of neighborhood programs at Creston, Arleta, Marysville, and Lent Schools will change from being a K-8 to being a K-5. This is part of the effort to fill the newly-reconstructed Kellogg Middle School on Powell Boulevard, which opened in the fall of 2021. Filling Kellogg has been a driving force behind the Enrollment and Program Balancing process for Southeast Portland.

Although the above changes will begin in the fall of 2023, Portland Public Schools’ multi-year process to develop a plan to balance student enrollment and programs across the district will continue for other schools. The district has said it will use both data-driven analysis and community input to address the needs of equity and inclusion, and transportation and facilities constraints, among other needs in PPS schools of all levels.

THE BEE will continue to report on this as the process continues. To see reports from the SEGC, and recommendations from the PPS Board, go online – http://www.pps.net/Page/13615



In the Foster-Powell neighborhood, Portland Police Bureau Crash Team officers investigate the death of a pedestrian on S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses – which they soon began to realize was an intentional act of murder.
In the Foster-Powell neighborhood, Portland Police Bureau Crash Team officers investigate the death of a pedestrian on S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses – which they soon began to realize was an intentional act of murder. (Photo by David F. Ashton)
This is a photo the man killed by the hit-and-run driver near Eastport Plaza on June 6, 42-year-old Vincent Timothy of Portland. His death is being prosecuted as an intentional murder.
This is a photo the man killed by the hit-and-run driver near Eastport Plaza on June 6, 42-year-old Vincent Timothy of Portland. His death is being prosecuted as an intentional murder. (Coursety of the family)

‘Homicide by truck’ slays pedestrian on SE 82nd

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

On Monday, June 6, just days after the Oregon Department of Transportation turned over State Highway 213 – that’s the road you know as S.E. 82nd Avenue of Roses – to the Portland Bureau of Transportation for the city to maintain, a man was struck and killed there, across from Eastport Plaza.

At 9:05 p.m., East Precinct officers -- who were originally sent to Gladstone Street at west of 82nd, found that a pedestrian who had been struck by a vehicle and had died at the scene was actually a block north, at Center Street, in the Foster-Powell neighborhood.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team was called in, and it wasn’t long until 26 PPB units had gathered there or were on their way.

There were several witnesses to the tragedy, including those across the street at the Taco Bell drive-through, and a few pedestrians.

However, a worker at the Eastport Food Carts told reporters he watched the situation unfold – and his account matched the security video obtained by police after the incident.

The witness told THE BEE that he heard the sound of someone gunning a large vehicle, looked up, and saw a full-size red pickup truck slam into the pedestrian and drag the victim’s body across the road. The pickup truck then turned around and took off, almost hitting a bicycle rider in the process.

Officers were able to determine the license plate number of the truck, and the suspect was found not far from the crash and taken into custody.

Police arrested 40-year-old Frederick Deatric Moore and booked him into the Multnomah County Detention Center (MCDC) late that night at 12:58 p.m., on charges of Murder in the Second Degree, and Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver (Hit & Run). Moore is still behind bars in the MCDC; his combined bail on the additional charges amount to $275.000.

Court documents showed that Moore was previously convicted of murder and robbery; and that PPB Crash Investigators do believe that he intentionally hit the pedestrian.

The victim in this case was identified publicly ten days later as 42-year-old Vincent Timothy of Portland. Mr. Timothy’s family has been notified of his death, and provided a photo.

The suspect in this homicide, Frederick Deatric Moore, was arraigned on Thursday, June 16th, charged with Murder in the Second Degree, Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver (Hit and Run), and other charges as determined by the District Attorney’s Office. Moore entered a “Not Guilty” plea

The investigation is ongoing. If you have information about this incident, please contact Detective Eric McDaniel -- Eric.McDaniel@portlandoregon.gov or 503/823-0833; or Detective Scott Broughton at Scott.Broughton@portlandoregon.gov or 503/823-3774. Your call would be regarding Case No. 22-151378.



Both Woodmere fifth grade students – and unicycle riders – Jimmie and Jordan pose for a photo with their retiring team coach, Jim Stultz.
Both Woodmere fifth grade students – and unicycle riders – Jimmie and Jordan pose for a photo with their retiring team coach, Jim Stultz. (Photo by David F. Ashton)

Woodmere School ‘unicycle team’ stars in parade

By DAVID F. ASHTON
For THE BEE

There are many forms of physical education and recreation provided for grade school kids. But the inimitable – and long-standing – “Unicycle Class” at Woodmere Elementary School in the Brentwood-Darlington neighborhood is really unique.

Actually, these talented kids don’t stand at all, they roll – and in a big way. In fact, these unicyclists led the Portland Rose Festival Junior Parade on June 8, riding along with its Grand Marshall this year, the Unipiper. 

A few days before that, students at Woodmere, along with, previewed their abilities at an assembly held in the school gym on June 3rd.

The poignant thing about the gala parade performance on Sandy Boulevard was that this was their last for their retiring P.E. teacher and Unicycle Club Coach, Jim Stultz (who, we should make clear, is NOT the Unipiper).

“At the end of the school year I’m retiring after 28 years there at Woodmere, and 33 years overall in education,” Stultz announced before the June 3rd assembly.

“What’s kept me here has been our great community and our staff,” remarked Stultz. “I’ve always felt like the school has been home for me; and our P.E. program is really supported by the parents and the administration, making this an easy place to work.”

He said the unicycle program came about after he stopped volleyball coaching – he’d built a championship-winning volleyball team at Clackamas High School. “I started riding a unicycle when I was 12, and I’ve been on them ever since,” Stultz recalled. “When I decided to bring this to my school, I started searching online, picking them up, one of the time, until I had 61 unicycles.”

While he generally starts with the fourth and fifth graders, the next to be given unicycles are third and second graders, Stultz said. “But, I’ve had some kindergarteners that have a lot of energy, they don’t mind falling, and are quick learners.

“Some kids learn in two weeks; for some kids it takes three years,” observed Stultz. “The lessons they learn are perseverance, physical coordination, and teamwork.

“But, the most important thing is having fun,” Stultz quickly added. “It is so much fun for them; and it’s also the most fun thing that I do,” he concluded as the school show began.

What’s next for Coach Jim Stultz? He wouldn’t say. But, we’d bet he’ll be doing it riding a unicycle.

Riding in groups, up and over ramps and teeter-boards – and even in the dark, with glowing spokes and necklaces – the school show, set to popular music, was astounding.

You’ll enjoy watching the exclusive BEE video below, showing the skills of these young unicycle riders, better than any words of ours can....

___________________________________________________________
 
 



Comments? News tips? Click here to submit!

Trying to remember or locate a BEE advertiser? Click here to e-mail us, and we'll help!

Fair warning:  We have so many great photos on page 2 this month, it may take a while to load on slower connections!  If that applies to you, click the link below, then go get refreshment, come back, relax, and prepare to enjoy what we have for you on page 2!

READY TO TURN TO PAGE 2 -- FOR "MORE NEWS"? Click here!

Note to readers: At some point, this, our original Internet website, will be replaced at this web address by our new website, as part of the Community Newspapers group. At that time, you will still be able to access this long-established and smartphone-friendly website, if you save this address:  www.readthebee.mobi. You'll still have your choice of which one to visit!

Entire contents © 2022, THE BEE
; all rights reserved.




HTML Hit Counters
Hit Counters